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Gender and narrative in L’Hiver de beauté, Les Ports du silence and La Rage au bois dormant by Christiane Baroche
Gill Rye

as physically. In another sense, however, with the introduction of a twentieth-century female narrator-protagonist, L’Hiver de beauté is resoundingly contemporary, a powerful novel in its own right. Les Ports du silence and La Rage au bois dormant, both published in the first half of the s, and L’Homme de cendres, which appeared in , are likewise all substantial novels dealing with major contemporary and universal themes: life and death, war, memory, love.5 In L’Hiver de beauté, the motif of the mirror functions on several different levels and as such lays

in Women’s writing in contemporary France
Sukanta Chaudhuri

as Bride he was, vpon the marrige daie. Since then, among the Shepeheards, Daphnis chiefe was had, And tooke a Nimphe to wife, when he was but a lad. Daphnis his Embleme. Me tamen vrit amor. 90 Menalcas his Embleme. At haec Daphne forsan probes. Goteheardes Embleme. Est minor nemo nisi comparatus. 2 Theocritus Idyll xi Translated anonymously from the Greek From Sixe Idillia . . . out of . . . Theocritus (1588). Polyphemus, a Cyclops or one-eyed giant, features in Homer’s Odyssey; but his love for Galatea, a Nereid or sea-nymph, is first treated by Theocritus and

in Pastoral poetry of the English Renaissance
Open Access (free)
Christopher Morgan

). It is important to note that, for Thomas, depictions of absence associated with the via negativa frequently give way to, or are countered by, depictions of affirmation and spiritual presence. J. P. Ward writes that ‘The God who eludes when all palpable things, even the senses themselves, are left behind, can suddenly be experienced in what is immediate and natural’ (1987: 98). Remembering Elaine Shepherd’s description of the via negativa as ‘a darkness which may on occasion … flame with love’, I will end this chapter by turning to examine such ‘occasions’ in Thomas

in R. S. Thomas
Steve Sohmer

: ‘Ivor Brown thinks she was Anne Whateley; perhaps “Rosalind” is a clue: the Rosalinds of Romeo and Juliet and of Love’s Labour’s Lost are both black beauties.’ 22 All such finger-pointing culminated in Rowse’s announcement in 1963 that Emilia Lanier was the dark lady. Since which date criticism of and hostility towards Rowse

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind
Open Access (free)
What lovers want
Arlyn Diamond

love. There are clandestine meetings in Melidor’s chamber, a higher-ranking suitor who is defeated at a grand tournament, a spying steward, a helpful maid and numerous battles. In the end Melidor and her mother convince the earl that he has no choice but to accept Degrevant. They live long and prosper, and after his wife’s death Degrevant returns to the Holy Land, to die on crusade. Although the distinction is far too neat, it is possible to divide our attention between the plot, with its focus on the actions and motivations of the main characters, and the poem

in Pulp fictions of medieval England
Open Access (free)
Christopher Morgan

, Phillips not only underscores the radical nature of Thomas’s religious stance but also suggests that Thomas’s answer to the philosophical ‘problem of evil’ is a view of deity characterised not by the divided imperatives of omnipotence or love, but by an omnipotence which is love, which is ‘self-emptying’ and which therefore encompasses both the good and evil, a sordid combination which the poet finds endemic to human existence. Such a view of divinity, according to Phillips, allows Thomas a faith response in keeping with his own experience: The poet turns his back on the

in R. S. Thomas
Sara Haslam

6 Visions in colour; religious visions According to the analysis in the last chapter, as William Sorrell travelled through the realised realm of his unconscious, what had been repressed in him was gradually translated into glorious action. His journey culminated, in the ‘real’ world of the text, in a poised harmony where talk, trust and fantasy, and the professional demands of publishing, could co-exist. (Feminine) nature and (masculine) civilisation were united. In The New Humpty-Dumpty, as Emily Aldington and Count Macdonald made love, they did so in a way

in Fragmenting modernism
Steve Sohmer

Shakespeare rehearsed his portrayal of Nashe in Love’s Labour’s Lost ; he wrote a warm, light-hearted miniature of his friend into the character of Moth (an anagram of Thom). Like Thom, Moth is small of stature, sharp of mind and tongue, and a masterful debunker of ignorance as personified by his master, the original bloviating ignoramus, Don Adriano de Armado. The play was written in

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind
Open Access (free)
Mother–daughter relations in Paule Constant’s fiction
Gill Rye

, separation from the mother. In Klein’s thinking, this process of separation involves, on the one hand, a conflict between the love and hate the infant feels for the mother (which gives rise to good and bad phantasmatic mothers) and, on the other, a conflict between both destructive and reparative impulses. Reparative impulses enable infants to rebuild internal phantasies of the good, loved object they feel they have destroyed in hate or anger. It is this ongoing conflict between destruction and reparation that gradually allows the child to separate psychologically from the

in Women’s writing in contemporary France
Clotilde Escalle’s tales of transgression
Michael Worton

resort to violence as a means not of salvation,but of survival.Furthermore,the violence is directed much more often against themselves than against others. These novels are tales of oppression, of violence and abuse, of masochism, of cruelty and despair, of lancinating indifference, and ultimately of  Transgressions and transformation transgression. They portray a world in which love is strikingly absent, if none the less sometimes – nostalgically rather than prospectively – yearned for. They present sex brutally and almost pornographically. They tear the soul

in Women’s writing in contemporary France