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-​twentieth century wars and infusing the central tenets of Oliver Stone’s life. Unsurprisingly, his ‘Vietnam trilogy’ has received some of the most intensive scrutiny among all his films, Wa r and the pictures certainly do parade Stone’s preoccupations with political judgement, Cold War consensus and, of course, the nature of conflict, as much as they do his cinematic pretensions. Yet few studies have really addressed these planks of his cinematic oeuvre, much less Stone’s engagement and viewpoint with the wider military and cultural consequences of the ‘American Century’, let

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
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Fixing the past in English war films

instinctively invokes if we want to talk about politics in everyday life. Englishness, however, has taken a bit of a pasting these past thirty or so years, and the kind that I am talking about was only embarrassed by the efforts of Mrs Thatcher and her cronies to reassert a fatuous Great Britishness, which turned out to be in truth a merely shop-keeping little Englandism. Those same efforts of hers compounded

in British cinema of the 1950s
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for the last time, the regal role is seen to confirm the star performer’s own majesty. In establishing her political power, the real-life Elizabeth made exceptionally effective use of her public self-display in rich apparel, stately ‘progresses’ through her realm and commissioned portraits, so becoming an iconic figure. Monarchy, in Ernst Kantorowicz’s influential theory of medieval and early modern culture, exists in the

in The British monarchy on screen
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Indigenous media and the Video nas Aldeias project

the life of an individual: both offer perspectives that are simultaneously privileged and partial, each in its own particular way. The fact that film-making is undertaken by insiders is no guarantee that it will not give rise to political or ethical problems since it is rare, whatever the nature of the community, for there to be complete unanimity about how social life should be understood, let alone about how it should be represented. In practice, indigenous media film-making usually falls into the hands of young people, mostly young men

in Beyond observation
A lost epic of the reign of Victoria

life of a famous political figure. This earlier film played at the new picture palaces of 1913 and 1914 throughout the UK to packed audiences. It received substantial media acclaim. The epic portrayed the most revered ‘star’ of recent British history. Its subject was the life and times of the monarch who had presided over an age of imperial expansion, a reign associated with progress in science, education, industry and

in The British monarchy on screen

life for tourists, selling handicrafts and giving lessons in animal tracking to outsiders who would never use these skills for real. While some ≠Khomani San, including the original claimant Dawid Kruiper, were prepared to take this route, others wanted to introduce commercial livestock farming onto the land (goats and sheep rather than cattle). But this would not only have threatened the continuation of the hunting and gathering way of life on which the original land claim had been built, but would also have undermined the political authority of Kriuper and his

in Beyond observation

with alleged or real connections to the libertines and their scabrous way of life, all intended to annoy and belittle the king, George III. Historian John Brewer follows the progress during the 1760s of publicist and libertine John Wilkes, who tenaciously spread a form of propaganda geared to exposing the lack of sexual morals at court and connecting it to political malfeasance. The purpose of this vigorous literary genre, argues Brewer, was to expose political intrigue – whether true or false – which had previously been hidden from the public, putting these

in Exposed
Films of the Sensory Ethnography Lab

other, more local factors to do with grazing permits in national parks. Arguably, it is this set of circumstances, more than any other, that impacts on the manner in which the characters in the film relate to the practice of sheep herding and, by extension, on the manner in which they relate to the animals. While Castaing-Taylor was trailing in the mountains, Barbash remained in Big Timber, and shot scenes of life in and around the town, including rodeos, shooting competitions, even political meetings. But when cutting the film, they decided to

in Beyond observation

4 The journalists and the rabbits The moment a person assumes the role of a reporter or political commentator and views a scandal through their eyes, the character of the scandal phenomenon changes inexorably. To a greater extent than the preceding chapters, this one will deal with journalism and politics as arenas and examine how the two of them interact today. It is especially politicians who are at the centre of public scandals, and for this reason it is mainly political journalists who through their work trigger and follow the development of scandals at

in Exposed
Recent films of David and Judith MacDougall

The original idea for this project arose from a suggestion by the Indian anthropologist Sanjay Srivastava that MacDougall might like to make a film that would complement Srivastava's own text-based ethnographic study of the Doon School in the early 1990s. Often referred to as ‘the Eton of India’, the Doon School is modelled on the most progressive variants of the British private school system and is renowned for having been attended by leading figures in many different walks of Indian public life: political, military, professional, also academic and literary

in Beyond observation