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The racecourse and racecourse life

innovative trainers were using the motor horse van, based on the design of the railway box, to transport horses to meetings more comfortably and with less injury, by the early 1920s. These soon rapidly increased in numbers and popularity.8 For the even wealthier, Doncaster began planning a racecourse landing strip in 1928, since some owners possessed private planes, and a forty-two-seater aircraft carried racegoers paying £8 each from Croydon to Speke Airport near Aintree in 1930.9 Air travel proved convenient for top jockeys and trainers, although the jockey Gordon

in Horseracing and the British 1919–39
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moved into the twenty-first century, the effects of economic liberalisation from the late 1950s saw the co-operative presence in the agrarian economy roll back. However, the popularity of the credit union movement, the rise of consumer co-operatives such as the Dublin Food Co-operative and Quay Co-op in Cork, and brewing co-operatives such as Boundary Brewing in Belfast and the Dublin Brewing Co-operative suggest that the model still has an important part to play in imagining how the Irish economy might develop once again, following an extended period of economic

in Civilising rural Ireland
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enough to confront chartist agitation. However, the 1842 Chadwick Report on the sanitary condition of the labouring population, journalistic and evangelical accounts of metropolitan life, and the popularity of urban novels, most notably those of Dickens, rediscovered the poor and reminded a middle-class public that the relative tranquillity of the period in the immediate aftermath of social and political turmoil could

in The other empire
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Invisibility and erasure in The Two Merry Milkmaids

construction’, except for the characters and the play-world that they inhabit. Since The Two Merry Milkmaids receives minimal critical attention and is to my knowledge never performed, it is worth beginning this discussion with an overview of the place of this play in relation to the popularity of invisibility on the early modern English stage. ‘Bound about with the ring

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
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agencies following the election of President Donald Trump in the 2016 US elections. We are now living in a world where words like ‘facts’ and ‘truth’ have to be used with considerable care in science and politics, where facts and truths compete with alternative facts or someone else’s truth. In an article for the Financial Times entitled ‘The Problem with Facts’, the economist Tim Harford explores, as the subtitle says, ‘how today’s politicians deal with inconvenient truths’. He uses a phrase that has gained popularity in science and society circles since 2006, when Al

in Science and the politics of openness
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fact that the ensuing boost in the polls proved short-lived lends extra credence to Ball’s suggestion that opposition parties often depend on government failings to improve their popularity. New Labour soon recovered its stride, and the opposition would have lapsed back to its 30 per cent rating even if it had been more credible. In hindsight, the Conservatives were regarded as opportunistic; had the government been more generally distrusted on a range of issues, the surge in Tory support would have lasted Introduction 5 much longer. Broughton also shows that the

in The Conservatives in Crisis
A comparative analysis

vitality depends upon a motivated membership and the securing of financial resources, and the incentives for these are mainly the result of the external factors in the situation. For this reason, organisational recovery tends to follow from an improvement in a party’s popularity, rather than being a first cause of it. After this, the effect can be cyclical, with investment in professional staff and publicity allowing the party to benefit from a return of support. This was the case with the most famous organisational recovery of 1947–51, particularly with Woolton’s fund

in The Conservatives in Crisis
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saints’ lives. This theme was explored in greater detail in a discussion of the role of noblewomen as patrons of the chroniclers and narratives. Such female influence may well have 198 conclusion affected the popularity of important texts in the twelfth century such as Geoffrey of Monmouth’s History of the Kings of Britain. The activity of noblewomen as patrons affected the way that specific genres developed, and they had important roles to play in the process of cultural diffusion. The development of views of women in chronicles and narratives was discussed in

in Noblewomen, aristocracy and power in the twelfth-century Anglo-Norman realm
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Royal of Belgium and head of state. Leopold abdicated on 16 July 1951 in Baudouin’s favour. Unlike his father, Baudouin was widely respected, particularly for his scrupulously neutral dealings with the Flemish and Walloon (French-speaking) communities and for his part in securing the country’s long transition to a federal state. His reign restored faith in the monarchy in Belgium. The extent of his popularity was revealed when

in The politics today companion to West European Politics
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persuaded to throw his hat into the ring and undergo a process which involved meeting one half of the search committee of sixteen at lunch and the other half at dinner before submitting to a formal interview with them all. As an appreciation of Richmond would reveal in 1990, the committee were ‘impressed by the clarity of thought and lucidity of expression which in their meetings with him had been combined with great good humour and a relaxed personal manner . . . ’. Referees’ reports assured them that ‘he was not prepared to court easy popularity but was willing and able

in A history of the University of Manchester 1973–90