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Seas, oceans and civilisations

coupled with the nascent institutions of imperial power, oceanic imaginaries produced maritime empires with goals for conquest via water rather than over land. Europe’s Atlantic seaboard states constructed imperial states of this kind. Collectively, they subjected oceanic space to a higher order of naval and 115 Saltwater horizons 115 juridical power, with far-​reaching consequences. Oceans and seas have been defined as zones of colonialism, especially over the course of the last five centuries (Bentley et al., 2007; Klein and MacKenthun, 2004). A goal of Europe

in Debating civilisations
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towards the liberatory properties of the public sphere and rationality. These are frequently associated with the Enlightenment, taken to be both an historical period and a philosophical disposition. The Enlightenment is then construed as the instrument or origin of racial and colonial domination. I am interested to present other ways, here, of thinking about the relations of racism, colonialism, and the public sphere. A persuasive alternative is suggested in Madhu Dubey’s account of contemporary black representation in the USA: even in the most difference

in Postcolonial contraventions

Europe racialise eastern Europeans as non-white, though in certain contexts they may (Longinović 2011 ; Fox, Moroşanu and Szilassy 2012 ); it also raises the uncomfortable, silenced, necessary question of what else eastern Europeans, identifying with ‘Europe’ and modernity, might be identifying with. Popular music itself, meanwhile, belongs to a history of globalisation structured by the routes and legacies of colonialism and Atlantic slavery (Gilroy 1993 ; Erlmann 1999 ; Radano and Bohlman (eds) 2000 ; Weheliye 2005 ; Lipsitz 2007 ; Denning

in Race and the Yugoslav region
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invite readers to agree, through their moral stance on apartheid, that the effects of territorialised ethnopolitics in Bosnia were similarly illegitimate and deleterious, might more sceptically question whether the separate histories of South African colonialism/apartheid and Balkan nationalism make this an inappropriate comparison, or might view ethnicised Othering in Bosnia as directly equivalent to Western prejudice against racialised minorities. 1 The mode of connection might do even more. The mode of connection might position apartheid in South

in Race and the Yugoslav region
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The imperial metropolis of Heart of Darkness

chapter1 21/12/04 11:07 am Page 21 1 Tale of the city: the imperial metropolis of Heart of Darkness Many decades ago, in Discourse on Colonialism, Aimé Césaire drew attention to the ‘boomerang effect’ of imperialism. His account suggests that the boomerang operates at two speeds. The fast boomerang returns as soon as it is dispatched: the brutal dehumanisation to which the colonised are subjected is immediately visited upon the coloniser, leading Césaire to the conclusion that ‘colonization … dehumanizes even the most civilized man: that the colonizer, who

in Postcolonial contraventions
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Crossing the margins

Marxist critic Aijaz Ahmad argues that imperialism and its late capitalist logic cannot be resisted by recourse to a fatally derivative nationalism, but by means of a rejuvenated post-Soviet socialism (1992: 287–318). Colonialism’s other, however, was never merely nationalism and/or socialism, but a spatial imagination which it had to reconfigure in its own controlling terms. Its ally in this ideological task was an historicism which naturalised colonialism’s own way of seeing and which blocked oppositional discourses. But a backwards glance at the cultural history of

in Across the margins
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Time and space

the “pre-political,” Guha rendered this historical subject as completely coeval with and a co-constituent of processes of politics under colonialism. 2 On the other hand, the sensibilities of a recuperative paternalism – alongside the procedures of a somewhat salvage scholarly style – meant that within the project the meanings and motivations of these peoples appeared filtered through the master

in Subjects of modernity
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Speaking of Ireland

’s analysis and Spivak’s question pressurise intellectually radical discourse that avows to be from ‘below’, in two distinct ways. For Memmi, the conditions of colonialism and the post-colonial outstrip the capacities of the scholarly, so that the possibility of finding an adequate, Norquay_03_Ch2 31 22/3/02, 9:46 am 32 Theorising identities conceptual and historical framework for the (post-)colonial is always archaised and shut off by the place in which that framework must be articulated. For Spivak, the critical voice (or any voice which speaks ‘about’ the colonised

in Across the margins
Emergency nursing in the Indian Mutiny

a strong female presence in British India at this time in relation to the ‘civilising mission’ of British colonialism in India, and indeed the presence of British women and children in India stemmed from a shift in colonial policy in the early part of the nineteenth century that emphasised the presence of soldiers’ and administrators’ families for various socially performative and practical reasons. Klaver explains that the rationale behind this shift in practice was that the soldiers themselves would be comforted by the presence of their wives and children during

in Colonial caring
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(Guyana) and British Honduras (Belize) was included. These British West Indian colonies formed a link between North and South America and were strategically vital to the European powers, particularly in the era of the sailing ship. They shared a history, of colonisation, displacement, slavery, emancipation, indenture, nationalism and anti-colonialism: a history out of which a particular kind of West

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain