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From content warning to censorship

classroom only as negative examples. How does this work? Well, many commentaries on contemporary masculinity quickly arrive at gangsta rap when  56 56 Vulnerability as a battleground they want to offer a clear example of sexist lyrics and behaviour. And yet numerous soft-​rock songs by John Mayer, Keith Urban, and others convey deeply sexist messages while strumming along to a benign rhythm. In Keith Urban’s song ‘A Little Bit of Everything’ (2013), he proposes: ‘I want a cool chick that’ll cook for me /​But’ll dance on the bar in her tan bare feet’. Okay, he wants a

in The power of vulnerability
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legal procedure in the handling of witch-trials, a factor which was also of paramount importance in explaining the relative paucity of witch-trials in other parts of Germany.3 Torture was used with restraint and often not at all in the Rothenburg trials, thus ensuring that all accused (as opposed to self-confessed) witches were able to maintain their denials of guilt. Serious legal action was never taken against those individuals accused by self-confessed witches of having been seen at witches’ dances. This was due partly to an elite scepticism about the reality

in Witchcraft narratives in Germany
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 –​which breached both pre-​war social, notably religious, mores and occupation norms. Living it up Another form of misconduct particularly associated with women involved ostentatious displays of joy, enjoyment, or luxury, especially in the company of Germans. For the occupied population, there was a difference between ‘frequenting the Germans’ (always implying sexual intimacy) and general ‘debauchery’ (which may have been less likely to involve sexual acts but rather other unrespectable actions such as drunkenness or dancing). Often actions regarded as sexual did not involve sex

in The experience of occupation in the Nord, 1914– 18
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Beyond the burden of the real

collaboration with others. Early in his career, in collaboration with William Heick, he made Blunden Harbour and Dances of the Kwakiutl (both released in 1951) in a Kwakw a k a ’wakw community on Vancouver Island. 1 Somewhat later, in mid-career, he made two collaborative films in India: Altar of Fire (released in 1976), produced in collaboration with the Sankritist J. F

in Beyond observation
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Colonial body into postcolonial narrative

body into postcolonial narrative 131 narrator, or female Defoe, puts it: ‘The story of Friday’s tongue is a story unable to be told, or unable to be told by me. That is to say, many stories can be told of Friday’s tongue, but the true story is buried within Friday, who is mute. The true story will not be heard till by art we have found a means of giving voice to Friday’ (Foe 118). The forms of expression available to Friday are either silent or repetitive. He dances, whirling round and round (Foe 92); he plays one tune on the flute, one combination of notes (Foe 95

in Stories of women
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Paul Gilroy’s The Black Atlantic

-accentuality and polysemy of black languages. For example, in black American ghetto speech the word work can mean dancing, labour, sexual activity or any nuanced combination of all three’ (p. 203). The fact that the word ‘work’ can denote, equally, ‘labour’, ‘dancing’ and ‘sexual activity’ suggests that, far from an opposition, there is a strong affinity among all the activities. What needs conceptualisation is how and why such a fluid linguistic interchangeability between the spheres can occur. And that requires a methodology that can allow for dialectical and dialogical

in Postcolonial contraventions
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sub-population (Afro-Caribbeans in Canada), focus on recreational sport, and enumerate how sport and its associated plurilocal social spaces are used to make (and break) the diaspora. The MCSC were primarily Afro-Caribbean-Canadians, born throughout the Anglo-Caribbean. They were mainly between 50 and 70 years of age, and knew each other in Canada for nearly four decades. I attended their parties, fundraising dances

in Sport in the Black Atlantic

1808) and the islands of Korčula (Venetian 1420–1797) and Lastovo (Ragusan until 1808). Dubrovnik and Korčula folk traditions both include the ‘moreška’, a sword-dance where two kings fight over a symbolic princess, which ethnologists have compared to Spanish ‘moros y cristianos’ (‘Moors and Christians’) customs, Venetian mock factional battles and English morris dancing. Its contest between a Black King, who has abducted the princess and whose dancers traditionally (though rarely today) wear black faces or masks, and a White King, who in Korčula

in Race and the Yugoslav region
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individual. Emotions, associated with signs, objects and the power of language (Ahmed, 2004 ), can be collectively felt and expressed (Ritivoi, 2002 ). Men’s stories told around the boundary, in their changing rooms, and at their hotels, parties, dances or meetings narrate the past: how it really was, how it may have been, and how they knew it was not, but hoped it would be. The truth or accuracy of

in Sport in the Black Atlantic
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people for dances, parties and bus trips. Riddick clarified: “[Michael] goes everywhere. He is the blackest black man on the team!” Riddick tried to clarify, “He likes to dance and party. Indians don’t drink. They wouldn’t fit in so we don’t invite them.” He points out two important aspects of Mavericks cricket: travelling and drinking, and labels these activities “black.” The

in Sport in the Black Atlantic