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Open Access (free)
Jane Brooks

first book to analyse the engagement of British Army nursing sisters with their combatant patients in the Second World War. By focusing on the psychological tactics that the sisters employed in negotiating the care of their patients, it demonstrates the beginnings of a transformation of nurses from the obedient servants of the hospital to the experts by the bedside, and therefore critical to the healing of the sick. Through the examination of nursing work, this book also extends the historiography of the soldier, the critical cog in the machinery of war. The

in Negotiating nursing
Open Access (free)
The Second World War and the Balkan Historikerstreit
David Bruce MacDonald

2441Chapter5 16/10/02 8:05 am Page 132 5 Masking the past: the Second World War and the Balkan Historikerstreit A very considerable part of the Croatian political elite, supported by the Catholic hierarchy and Archbishop Alojzije Stepinac himself, supported this national and religious intolerance, and strongly supported policies of clericalism and racism, marked by mass killings, forced conversions and the deportation of the Serbian Orthodox population as well the slaughter of the Jews and Gypsies. (Dušan Bataković, ‘The National Integration of the Serbs

in Balkan holocausts?
Jane Brooks

1 Salvaging soldiers, comforting men On 2 September 1939, the eve of the Second World War, the Nursing Mirror declared that a nurse ‘is not brought up to expect ease and comfort, but rather to learn to create ease and comfort for others’.1 This chapter examines the role of military nurses in war zones across the globe in providing this ‘ease and comfort’ for their combatant patients, and doing so in increasingly confident and humanitarian modes. Preparations began for the mobilisation of the Queen Alexandra’s Imperial Military Nursing Service (QAs), their

in Negotiating nursing
Open Access (free)
Jane Brooks

overseas in the Second World War, the use of female nurses in upholding this resolve was integral to the war effort.2 Military commanders, particularly General Montgomery,3 appreciated and heralded the placement of female nurses in hospitals in forward areas as a means of ‘lifting the lonely soldier’s morale’.4 Military authorities were aware of female nurses as a powerful tool and used their presence as women, especially women from the same nation as the soldiers, as a weapon to encourage the continued participation of men in battle. Nursing sisters’ testimonies

in Negotiating nursing
Open Access (free)
‘Numbers games’ and ‘holocausts’ at Jasenovac and Bleiburg
David Bruce MacDonald

either ‘Serbophobia’ or ‘Greater Serbia’. This chapter reviews two of the most important persecution myths emerging from the Second World War. Revising the history of the Ustaša-run death-camp at Jasenovac was a useful means of casting Serbs as the victims of a ‘Holocaust’ by Croats. On the Croatian side, the massacre at Bleiburg (Austria) by Communist forces (or Serb-led Communists, as the case might be) in 1945 was also likened to the Holocaust. In both cases, the other side was accused of committing genocide, using either the mask of Nazi or Communist domination to

in Balkan holocausts?
Open Access (free)
Robert Mackay

. For many years after 1945, a historiographical consensus about the morale of the British people in the Second World War existed undisturbed. The roots of this consensus went back to the war, notably to the year-long national crisis that began in June 1940. During this time, from a mixture of reality and propaganda, an image of the nation at war was created whose accuracy was later largely accepted by commentators. According to this picture, the people endured the dangers and burdens that total war imposed on them with fortitude, a capacity to adapt, and unwavering

in Half the battle
Open Access (free)
Geoffrey K. Roberts and Patricia Hogwood

, and was then briefly mayor of Stepney, in London. He became an MP in 1922, and served as a junior minister in the Labour governments led by Ramsay MacDonald in 1924 and 1929–31. As leader of the Labour Party during the Second World War, he was brought into Churchill’s coalition cabinet. After the general election of 1945 had taken place (but before votes had been counted, a delay because of the large numbers of votes from

in The politics today companion to West European Politics
Re-thinking Ludwik Fleck’s concept of the thought-collective according to the case of Serbian archaeology
Monika Milosavljević

serology, haematology, experimental medicine, immunology, bacteriology, the methodology of science, scientific observations and the history of discoveries. In 1935, owing to his Jewish identity, he was dismissed from the laboratory at which he had worked since 1928. When the Germans occupied Lviv at the start of the Second World War, he was the director of the bacteriological laboratory within the city’s Jewish hospital. It was at this time that he succeeded in developing a reliable diagnostic test for typhus, which provided swift detection and isolation in the midst of

in Communities and knowledge production in archaeology
Jane Brooks

McBryde’s published memoir written nearly 50 years after the end of the Second World War. It is therefore prone both to relating the dramatic interventions required to engage a readership, and the nostalgia invoked by nurses when they considered their wartime lives. Nevertheless, it demonstrates the new surgical work that nurses expected to encounter as part of their overseas duties. Student nurses who trained between 1939 and 1945 cared for civilians injured by enemy bombing campaigns and combatants evacuated back to Britain from war zones. Thus, even before overseas

in Negotiating nursing
Open Access (free)
‘Eigen volk eerst!’
Cas Mudde

the extreme wing of the deteriorating Frontpartij and other small Flemish nationalist groups (De Wever 1992), it was left with only one principal rival prior to the Second World War: the Verbond van Dietse Nationaal-Solidaristen (Association of Diets National Solidarists, Verdinaso), founded in 1931 by Joris Van Severen. This was a para-military movement that originally had an almost similar goal as the VNV, i.e. a corporatist, authoritarian and ‘organic’ Greater Netherlands. However, in the mid 1930s it changed its goal into a ‘Diets Empire’, including Luxembourg

in The ideology of the extreme right