Jonathan Colman

. Subsequently, the White House regarded the Prime Minister almost as an irrelevance and was little inclined to consult him on American foreign policy. The President was also concerned in this period about British economic weakness. He despatched an adviser to London to see Wilson to try to investigate and possibly shape the British budget of 6 April so that it would harmonise with the interests of the United States. Wilson agreed to

in A ‘special relationship’?
Open Access (free)
Kjell M. Torbiörn

three months of aerial attacks, NATO stood victorious and a major international troop presence restored relative calm to the province. The Kosovo War led to intensified discussion in Europe and the United States over the need for increased European defence spending and operational efficiency within the alliance and over the prospects of more ‘outof-area’ peacekeeping or peacemaking operations, such as in the ‘former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia’ in 2001. European efforts to achieve greater defence autonomy (see also Chapter 9) met with initial scepticism by the

in Destination Europe
Jonathan Colman

The months May–December 1965 saw several developments in the Wilson– Johnson relationship. The White House feared, in the light of London’s ongoing Defence Review, that economic troubles might compel the Wilson government to reduce its military commitments East of Suez, leaving the United States as the only world policeman. This possible scenario worried President Johnson, with the result that his

in A ‘special relationship’?
Open Access (free)
Spiritualism and the Atlantic divide
Bridget Bennett

a phenomenon that originated in the United States and spread first across the Atlantic and then world-wide. In this essay I will argue that a transatlantic focus challenges existing orthodoxies and suggests new areas of investigation. Yet in describing this agenda for reading spiritualism I am conscious that this chapter asks more questions than it answers (and may, at times, seem to raise issues and give examples only to move elsewhere). Though many American and British spiritualists were more interested in the site of the seance, and the revelations it might

in Special relationships
Open Access (free)
Janet Wolff

, moved to the United States with his family (parents and two sisters) in about 1891. His father, Jacob Norr, was a tailor, who also established himself in the real estate business in New York. His mother, Dina, was a wig-maker for orthodox Jewish women. Henry went to City College, became a secondary school teacher, and, in 1926, took the post of principal of Evander Childs High School in the Bronx. His obituary in The New York Times in 1934, on his early death of a heart attack at the age of fifty-three, quotes the new City Superintendent of Schools, Harold G. Campbell

in Austerity baby
Open Access (free)
Jonathan Colman

Reagan’. 5 The literature of the Anglo-American ‘special relationship’ For the purpose of this work the Anglo-American ‘special relationship’ is defined as unusually close institutional bonds, frequent consultation and concerted policies between the governments of Britain and the United States, and, in the most rarefied sense, to regular, cordial and productive mutual dealings between

in A ‘special relationship’?
Paul Latawski and Martin A. Smith

officially from December 1941 – the United States had, with one exception, chosen to remain aloof from European security affairs. The exception had been US involvement in the latter stages of the First World War. Even then, however, there was a distinct undercurrent of ambiguity about the American stance. US participation was as an ‘associated power’ rather than a full ally of France and Great Britain. In addition, as is well known

in The Kosovo crisis and the evolution of post-Cold War European security
From the ‘militant’ to an ‘immunised’ route?
Ami Pedahzur

policy of response. An attempt is made to find the ‘golden path’, that is, a middle way which reconciles between the state’s duty of and right to self-protection in the face of its adversaries, on the one hand, and avoidance of a descent into counteractive strategies deviating from democratically legal and moral frameworks, on the other. Then, in the second part of the chapter, the Israeli response is viewed in a comparative perspective with policies of other democracies, specifically, the United States and Germany. Drawing a comparison with these countries will help

in The Israeli response to Jewish extremism and violence
Open Access (free)
Elana Wilson Rowe

transboundary pollutants; and opening up new areas for cooperation, such as the recent Central Arctic Ocean fisheries treaty. The continued engagement of the United States and Russia in regional politics as both active and ‘resting’ great powers is, in other words, essential for maintaining and expanding cooperation. Global politics today is marked by enduring, seemingly unresolvable strife and suffering in regional wars and proxy wars; a growing preoccupation with putting domestic politics ‘first’; and a populist backlash against expert knowledge, including against the

in Arctic governance
Jonathan Colman

The period August 1966–September 1967 saw a decline in Wilson’s commitment to President Johnson and to the United States, both personally and in the wider context of British foreign policy. In February 1967, the Prime Minister tried to use the visit to London of the Russian leader Alexei Kosygin to bring Hanoi and Washington to the negotiating table over Vietnam. Wilson was sincere – if over

in A ‘special relationship’?