Search results

Open Access (free)
Julie Evans, Patricia Grimshaw, David Philips, and Shurlee Swain

, the massive legacies of colonialism in the social and economic sphere continue to challenge the different sense of community that is now being built in the new South Africa. Notes 1 R. Bartlett, ‘Citizens Minus: Indians and the Right to Vote’, Saskatchewan Law Review , 44 (1979–80), p. 189

in Equal subjects, unequal rights
Open Access (free)
Science and industrial development: lessons from Britain’s imperial past
Sabine Clarke

. Patarau, By-Products of the Cane Sugar Industry (Amsterdam: Elsevier, 1989). 3 Havinden and Meredith, Colonialism and Development , Conclusion.

in Science at the end of empire
Open Access (free)
Europe’s ‘zero hour’
Kjell M. Torbiörn

happened before. European powers largely dominated the world in the eras of colonialism and, later, imperialism and competed fiercely with one another in what they saw as a ‘zero-sum game’ in the world at large and within Europe itself. Enemy images, and national histories, had been formed in centuries of warfare. Wealth was so scarce that the thought of sharing it with a rival, or trying to increase it through open trade, was virtually impossible. Not that these struggles diminished the resourcefulness of European powers or, seen from the outside, of Europe as a whole

in Destination Europe
Charles V. Reed

India’, in The Invention of Tradition , ed. Eric Hobsbawm and Terence Ranger (Cambridge, 1983 ), 165–210; Bernard Cohn, Colonialism and Its Forms of Knowledge (Princeton, 1996); Nicholas Dirks, Castes of Mind: Colonialism and the Making of Modern India (Princeton, 2001). See also Colin Newbury, Patrons, Clients, and Empire: Chieftaincy and Over-rule in Asia, Africa, and the Pacific

in Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911
Open Access (free)
The predicament of history
Bill Schwarz

determined to work through for themselves an idea of life after colonialism. If for the domestic British decolonisation was something which occurred ‘elsewhere’ – overseas and out of sight – then the Caribbean experience may provide a partial exception: it happened, had those in the metropole only been able to see, before their very eyes. In recovering these traditions of intellectual thought we

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Sabine Clarke

of the British government (p. 44). 5 TNA, CO 852/1037/1. 6 TNA, CO 852/874/5. 7 TNA, CO 852/874/5. 8 Havinden and Meredith, Colonialism and Development , pp. 253–255. 9 TNA, CO 295/642/4. 10 National Archives of Trinidad and Tobago (NATT), Box 6, no. 4, “Report of the Economics Committee, 1949”. 11 K. Meighoo, Politics in a Half-Made Society: Trinidad and Tobago 1925–2001 (Kingston: Ian Randle

in Science at the end of empire
Open Access (free)
Education and development in modern Southeast Asian history
Tim Harper

-education of its subjects away from a slavish colonial mentality and to the inculcation of the Nippon sheisin, the élan of imperial Japan. Despite the disintegration of Japan’s constructive colonialism into war imperialism and repression, several aspects of this experience endured. The first is that the numbers of Southeast Asians sent to Japan dramatically increased in number. The evidence shows that many played a role in post-colonial education and that their worldview was significantly shaped by their time overseas (Akashi 1978). Second, the methods of Japanese schools in

in History, historians and development policy
Neil Macmaster

Islam was the final refuge of these values that were hounded and profaned by an outrageous colonialism’.47 Nationalist discourse invariably presented women and the domestic habitus as the ultimate redoubt of Algerian identity, and this construct meant that the Islamic code of law which regulated the family would need to be cleansed of all French or western accretions that had polluted the pure tradition. Benabdallah wrote: ‘The strength of Algerian Islam resides in effect in the extent to which its spirit is in harmony with that of Algerian civilisation. It contains

in Burning the veil
Open Access (free)
John Marriott

poor resulted from attempts to understand the anachronistic presence in the modern metropolis of a population that defied modernity. 101 It was historically coterminous with the emergence of a distinctly modern colonialism characterized by a ‘coherently “anthropological” mode of typifying natives’. 102 In this endeavour race was originally an analytical category with which human culture could be

in The other empire
Open Access (free)
John Marriott

Subcontinent, 1765–1856 , Delhi, Oxford University Press, 1978; Charles Batten, Pleasurable Instruction. Form and Convention in Eighteenth-Century Travel Writing , Berkeley, University of California Press, 1978; Sara Mills, Discourses of Difference. An Analysis of Women’s Travel Writing and Colonialism , London, Routledge, 1991; Dennis Porter, Haunted Journeys. Desire and

in The other empire