Open Access (free)
The Algerian war and the ‘emancipation’ of Muslim women, 1954–62
Author: Neil Macmaster

In May 1958, and four years into the Algerian War of Independence, a revolt again appropriated the revolutionary and republican symbolism of the French Revolution by seizing power through a Committee of Public Safety. This book explores why a repressive colonial system that had for over a century maintained the material and intellectual backwardness of Algerian women now turned to an extensive programme of 'emancipation'. After a brief background sketch of the situation of Algerian women during the post-war decade, it discusses the various factors contributed to the emergence of the first significant women's organisations in the main urban centres. It was only after the outbreak of the rebellion in 1954 and the arrival of many hundreds of wives of army officers that the model of female interventionism became dramatically activated. The French military intervention in Algeria during 1954-1962 derived its force from the Orientalist current in European colonialism and also seemed to foreshadow the revival of global Islamophobia after 1979 and the eventual moves to 'liberate' Muslim societies by US-led neo-imperialism in Afghanistan and Iraq. For the women of Bordj Okhriss, as throughout Algeria, the French army represented a dangerous and powerful force associated with mass destruction, brutality and rape. The central contradiction facing the mobile socio-medical teams teams was how to gain the trust of Algerian women and to bring them social progress and emancipation when they themselves were part of an army that had destroyed their villages and driven them into refugee camps.

Colonial powers and Ethiopian frontiers 1880–1884 is the fourth volume of Acta Aethiopica, a series that presents original Ethiopian documents of nineteenth-century Ethiopian history with English translations and scholarly notes. The documents have been collected from dozens of archives in Africa and Europe to recover and present the Ethiopian voice in the history of Ethiopia in the nineteenth century. The present book, the first Acta Aethiopica volume to appear from Lund University Press, deals with how Ethiopian rulers related to colonial powers in their attempts to open Ethiopia for trade and technological development while preserving the integrity and independence of their country. In addition to the correspondence and treatises with the rulers and representatives of Italy, Egypt and Great Britain, the volume also presents letters dealing with ecclesiastical issues, including the Ethiopian community in Jerusalem.

Open Access (free)
Katie Pickles

In 1978 the Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire, an organization of Canadian women founded in 1900 and still in existence, changed its name to ‘just IODE’, an often used informal abbreviation. As one member put it: ‘IODE really doesn’t stand for anything.’ 1 That was the hope of publicity officers at national headquarters in Toronto, who initiated the name change keen

in Female imperialism and national identity
Open Access (free)
Empire, migration and the 1928 English Schoolgirl Tour
Katie Pickles

. Empire unity The tour was part of the British Government’s Empire settlement scheme of the 1920s, as outlined in the previous chapter. The tour organizers, however, were operating on a much grander level than simply expecting that the twenty-five schoolgirls would themselves emigrate. Related to immigration, Empire unity was the theme behind the organization of educational excursions

in Female imperialism and national identity
Open Access (free)
Rima D. Apple

worked in colonial and post-colonial settings did so in a search for adventure; some for humanitarian reasons; some were thrust into nursing out of necessity. Most struggled under adverse physical conditions, often with limited resources. Though some were closely supervised, others found themselves willing or unwilling independent healthcare providers with a limited or non-existent support network. All were sent as ambassadors of Western medicine and their presence was vital in maintaining the strength of empire. During war, they cared for the sick and wounded and

in Colonial caring
Open Access (free)
Looking beyond the state
Anna Greenwood

fields. It instead makes some tentative steps to describing just one small aspect of the untidy reality of Empire. The history of an institution such as the Colonial Medical Service, which seems outwardly to represent the pinnacle of an elite government agency, in fact reveals pervasive and persuasive stereotypes (which undoubtedly also represent some aspects of the reality) that are uncomfortably difficult to

in Beyond the state
John Marriott

; economically, it reduced the pool of unproductive labour and the diversion of precious financial resources in relief of destitution to the benefit of nation and empire. It was an ethos that combined personal and national salvation. Thus were established in broad outline the principles that were to culminate in the 1834 Poor Law Amendment Act, not in the event for the salvation of the nineteenth-century poor

in The other empire
The example of the German principality of Waldeck
Andreas Flurschütz da Cruz

Brewer, The Sinews of Power: War, Money and the English State, 1688–1783 (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1989). 5 Venice, Archivio di Stato di Venezia (ASVe), Senato, Deliberazioni, Corti, Registri, 63, and other holdings; Benjamin Arbel, ‘Venice’s Maritime Empire in the Early Modern Period’, in A Companion to Venetian History, 1400–1797, 174 Subsidies, diplomacy, and state formation Those three powers are politically characterized by their corporate structure and mixed monarchical or republican constitution. Their oligarchic regimes favoured a ‘classical republican

in Subsidies, diplomacy, and state formation in Europe, 1494–1789
Open Access (free)
Contextualising colonial and post-colonial nursing
Helen Sweet and Sue Hawkins

a number of colonial and post-colonial settings. Whilst we have taken pains to select chapters that incorporate nursing provided by colonial powers across Western Europe and the USA to make this as globally representative as possible, we are well aware that in the ten chapters that follow we can only touch the surface of the story. By the end of the First World War, and despite the Western nations’ ‘Scramble for Africa’4 the British Empire still covered about one quarter of the Earth’s total land area and ruled a population in excess of 500 million people. The

in Colonial caring
Open Access (free)
Sabine Clarke

During the 1930s, episodes of violent protest by the inhabitants of Britain’s Caribbean colonies brought the extremely poor living and working conditions that existed in these territories to domestic and international attention. Revelations of widespread unemployment, squalid housing and malnutrition threatened the moral authority of British rule and provided fuel for critics of British imperialism. As a result, Britain made a commitment to improving living conditions in an area of the British Empire that it had previously neglected. This

in Science at the end of empire