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Open Access (free)
Pasts and presents
Joe Turner

should think here of the imagining of the ‘good’ migrant who can be familial, empathised with and even celebrated (such as 246 Bordering intimacy in the Arrivals: Making Sheffield Home exhibition). Humanitarian and civic nationalist appeals to show solidarity with, humanise and defend migrants reveal that there is more going on in liberal states than a relentless politics of dispossession and violence towards people on the move. There are attempts here to contest borders in ways that are attuned to valuing multiculturalism and thinking nationalism and

in Bordering intimacy
Philip Cerny

attention to image-building that characterize the modern media, along with the fragmentation of post-modern culture and the growing salience of multicultural identity-formation, create a disorienting disarticulation of previously embedded cultures both from above (the ‘global village’ combined with the ‘clash of civilizations’) and below (such as ethnic sub-and-cross-nationalism and alienation of ghettoized minorities). These interacting forms 94 DISCIPLINES of social and cultural fragmentation are undermining overarching national identities based on the reconciliation

in Democratization through the looking-glass
James Bohman

distinctive zero-sum character of religious conflict within a particular political community. With the emergence of genuinely multicultural and even global polities, religion has lost its central place, and become only one aspect of pluralism among many. It has at the same time taken on increasing significance between societies, exacerbated today by unprecedented migration and the rise of religious fundamentalism throughout the world. In the light of this historical difference between the newer and the older situations of religious toleration, it is now important to

in The culture of toleration in diverse societies
Open Access (free)
Joe Turner

that approximately 1,400 children in Rotherham alone could have been targets of exploitation over a fifteen-year period (Jay 2014). However, what framed this scandal and energised the parameters of the moral panic was a competing set of racialised and sexualised imaginaries and logics. This worked to make the scandal one that concerned multiculturalism, citizenship and ‘integration’. Despite the fact that two of those convicted in Rotherham were white women, the news coverage focused almost exclusively on the background of the male perpetrators who, whilst all

in Bordering intimacy
Open Access (free)
Cas Mudde

these two ethnic communities had fought with the Germans in ‘previous wars’. chap3 28/5/02 70 13.31 Page 70 Germany which the reviewer almost desperately remarks: ‘Does Tichy fail to see that nature created people of different ethnic communities, and that those, who want to change this inflict severe harm to the ethnic communities.’ However, the reviewer knows the aim of Tichy: ‘the destabilisation of these ethnic communities, so that the plan to de-Germanise [entdeutschen] Germany and to lead it into a multicultural society still succeeds’ (DNZ 20/7/90). The

in The ideology of the extreme right
Open Access (free)
Cas Mudde

recently fluctuated heavily in both structure and volume. The papers of the VB and the REP make a professional impression, especially since the late 1980s, and are published regularly (every month) and consistently. One of the most remarkable differences between the parties is in the breadth of the literature. At one extreme is the CD, which is virtually a single-issue party, opposing the creation of a multi-cultural society in the Netherlands. Few attempts are made in the literature to substantiate this opposition through ideological arguments. This is not much

in The ideology of the extreme right
Open Access (free)
What does race have to do with the Yugoslav region?
Catherine Baker

history might be? 3 Gilroy both calls for a ‘transcultural, international’, non-nation-state-centric mode of black social, intellectual and cultural history inside and outside Europe (Gilroy 1993 : 4) and emphasises that racialised hierarchies of belonging, the legacies of colonialism and slavery, are still circulating the globe in what many Americans and Europeans were then imagining as the supposedly cosmopolitan, multicultural and post-racial present (Gilroy 2004 ); moreover, his anti-essentialism towards race and racism harmonises with the deconstruction of

in Race and the Yugoslav region
Open Access (free)
Tracing relatedness and diversity in the Albanian–Montenegrin borderland
Jelena Tošić

historic acceptance of diversity. In this context, ethno-religious conflict would potentially imply forging war not only against friends and neighbours – as was the tragic case in former Yugoslavia – but also against one’s next of kin.22 This, however, is particularly unlikely in a society where kinship remains the basis of identification, social cohesion and everyday life, and implies deep historical knowledge23 and a central reference point for belonging. What are the implications of the encounter between European Union (EU) multicultural policies and this historic and

in Migrating borders and moving times
Open Access (free)
Katie Pickles

history, and Canada as a nation dramatically changed. From mimicking a British imperial centre in population, economics, politics and culture, Canada has moved beyond dominion status to become a globally powerful multicultural nation state, whose identity is centred in its geographical location. French Canadian identity is now partially recognized, with on-going tension and controversy over the right to self

in Female imperialism and national identity
Open Access (free)
The failure of history
Neil Macmaster

political consequences’.10 By the early twenty-first century it might have been expected that educated political elites would have been highly attuned to the negative impacts of past colonial empires that had unthinkingly imposed their own values on ‘inferior’ subject peoples. In the post-colonial age of multiculturalism, anti-racism and universal rights it was widely acknowledged that it was no longer morally or politically right to steamroller the culture of other ‘races’ or peoples. But since 9/11 there has been a significant revival among academic historians and

in Burning the veil