Search results

You are looking at 51 - 60 of 88 items for :

  • Manchester History of Medicine x
Clear All
Open Access (free)
Health as moral economy in the long nineteenth century
Christopher Hamlin

the sources of stress – God, men, or a society that so signally despises isolated pregnant women? Or perhaps she would be protesting a more general frailty of nature – the cold and exhaustion that bring on hopelessness, or even the nature of the body of a fertile female. Accrediting Agnes's experience requires giving her a vocabulary. What might be the keywords for converting experience into protest? Two would be ‘misery’ and ‘miserable’. Yet, as with ‘complain’ and ‘complaint’, the OED chronicles confusion: both conflation and inversion of

in Progress and pathology
Open Access (free)
Gareth Millward

vaccination show wider concerns about the relationship between the state, its citizens and the nature of public health governmentality. 25 The book does this by building on existing histories of specific diseases and vaccine crises. This has been a common feature of the historiography of British immunisation policy. Works on the introduction of BCG (Bacillus Calmette-Guérin, an anti-tuberculosis vaccine), diphtheria immunisation, polio vaccine and hepatitis B vaccine have given insight into the scientific, political and cultural context of vaccination and how it was

in Vaccinating Britain
Open Access (free)
Gareth Millward

convenient for parents and children. It was a form of communication; a translation of the diffuse behaviours of the public into a language which administrators and policy makers could understand. Apathy is an amorphous concept. Indeed, the imprecise nature of the term in itself gives us insight into the motivations and thinking behind local and national policy. This chapter therefore attempts not to deconstruct how the concept was experienced by parents in 1950s Britain but, rather, to explore how it was used – often without precision – by various

in Vaccinating Britain
Open Access (free)
Narratives of balance and moderation at the limits of human performance
Vanessa Heggie

civilisations. Making a ‘balanced team’: finding the right men In addition to balance constituting a literal property of the human body, the term balance also carried metaphorical weight, providing ways of understanding the world and shaping the nature of research programmes and expeditionary teams. In particular, there were parallels between the ecosystem of the body and that of the research group. Expeditions in spaces such as Everest or the South Pole functioned with a fixed set of resources – whether it was

in Balancing the self
A national ethics committee and bioethics during the 1990s
Duncan Wilson

Journal, Vol. 326 (2003) p. 1276. Emphasis added. 6 Lock, ‘Towards a National Bioethics Committee’. 7 Kennedy, interview with the author (2010). See also Capron, ‘Looking Back at the President’s Commission’. 8 Kennedy, interview with the author (2010). Consolidating the ‘ethics industry’ 245 9 On the public nature of the Commission’s work, see Capron, ‘Looking Back at the President’s Commission’, p. 8. 10 Kennedy, ‘Consumerism in the Doctor–Patient Relationship’, Listener, 11 December 1980, pp. 777–80 (pp. 780, 777). 11 Ibid, p. 777. 12 Ian Kennedy

in The making of British bioethics
Bonnie Evans

’s mental stability. As they argued: ‘Whom an infant chooses as his attachment object and how many objects he selects depend, we believe, primarily on the nature of the social setting in which he is reared and not on some intrinsic characteristic of the attachment function itself.’ 72 They sought to understand attachment not as a problem of relationships but as a problem of ‘social

in The metamorphosis of autism
The Fowlers and modern brain disorder
Kristine Swenson

‘self-made’ was in tension with the religious idea of ‘self-culture’, introduced to the American public by the Unitarian theologian William Ellery Channing and then spread through the writings of nineteenth-century transcendentalists and progressives, such as Ralph Waldo Emerson and James Russell Lowell. Channing defined self-culture as the ‘care which every man owes to himself, to the unfolding and perfecting of his nature’, and noted that Americans held the ‘means of improvement, of self-culture, possessed no where else’. 40

in Progress and pathology
Liesbeth Hesselink

concentrating on sick-nursing and on founding hospitals. Some were exclusively intended for Europeans; others welcomed all ethnic groups. Of a slightly different nature was the Semarang-based Society for the Promotion of Native Nursing Practices, whose aim was to promote 148 Nursing in the Dutch East Indies 7.1  Mrs Bervoets and her husband with student nurses and student midwives in Mojowarno around 1910 the interests of native nursing – just as the mission intended to do.18 Business interest occasioned a need for medical care among companies to serve their employees

in Colonial caring
Visualising obesity as a public health concern in 1970s and 1980s Britain
Jane Hand

, healthy or unhealthy, self or other. 43 This duality in health advice enabled the HEC, and by extension the state, to ‘shape food preferences and beliefs in everyday life, to support some food choices and militate against others, and to contribute to the construction of subjectivity and embodied experiences’. 44 The role of the state in this process raises questions about the nature of citizenship in 1970s and 1980s Britain. The rise

in Balancing the self
Bonnie Evans

, one of his main goals was to draw a distinction between what had previously been termed ‘educational psychology’ and what he referred to as ‘clinical psychology’. 12 He wanted to develop an objective science of psychology based on direct observation that was primarily experimental in nature, yet which also got to the heart of subjectivity and self-hood. 13 In this way

in The metamorphosis of autism