Open Access (free)
The adolescent girl and the nation
Elleke Boehmer

family-nation analogy is thus carefully established). In Judith Kegan Gardiner’s description: ‘[the] father’s domestic narcissicism [is identified] with the capitalist patriarchy that dominates the [“childlike”] undeveloped world [sic]’.13 The two exist in symbiotic relationship. As this implies, child, especially daughterly, rebellion in Sam’s world signifies the ultimate – the most difficult, costly and disruptive – project of liberation, breaking open the tightly packed equations of domestic, national and international/imperial power. The rebellious Louie is, crucially

in Stories of women
Open Access (free)
Kinneret Lahad

considering how patriarchy and heteronormativity overlap and intersect with other structures of domination such as singlism and ageism, and are carried out through gendered configurations of time. It is important to stress that singlism is a socially shared belief, one that impacts upon multiple facets of life including housing, wages, and unequal access to services and benefits (DePaulo 2006). As DePaulo (2006) and Hacker (2001) point out, single persons are often excluded from discounted health benefits, greater social security options, lower tax bills, and higher

in A table for one
Open Access (free)
Lesbian citizenship and filmmaking in Sweden in the 1970s
Ingrid Ryberg

vulnerability in large agreement with the government report that shortly followed in understanding homosexuals as victims of discrimination and prejudice due to lack of knowledge and misconceptions that they are deviant and different from heterosexuals. The Woman in Your Life Is You, on the other hand, was not formally handled or recognised as a film about lesbians but as about ‘women’s rights to their own bodies’, invoking one of the key slogans of the new women’s movement at the time. Vulnerability is here set in motion in terms of women’s oppression under patriarchy and as

in The power of vulnerability
Open Access (free)
Elleke Boehmer

:john:Public:John's Mac: John's Jobs Introduction 13 cultural productions of Third World women and men, inevitably runs the risk of ‘collapsing’ the world into the west.39 Displacing subaltern interests, or so it might appear, a study of this kind can seem to become complicit with the ‘rewriting and silencing’ projects of patriarchy and imperialism. As Spivak cautions: ‘a concern with women, and men, who have not been written in the same cultural inscription . . . cannot be mobilised in the same way as the investigation of gendering in one’s own’.40 Juliana Nfah-Abbenyi encapsulates

in Stories of women
Gender and nationalism in the early fiction of Flora Nwapa
Elleke Boehmer

reflects on what I have suggested is a powerful effect of her writing: that of counterbalancing in her use of language and in characterisation a postcolonial literary patriarchy and a matrifocal nationalism. In the crucial decade of the 1960s, Nwapa in Idu and Efuru re-angled the perspective laid down in male writing, showing where and in what ways women wield verbal and actual power. If nationalism is typically embodied in patriarchal formations and fraternal bonding, and involves the apparent exclusion of women from public life, then Nwapa, in choosing not to engage

in Stories of women
Open Access (free)
Postcolonial women writers in a transnational frame
Elleke Boehmer

fluttering national flag is visible. In Arundhati Roy the contrast between the gods of the ‘small’ – the personal, the domestic – as against those associated with bigger ‘things’ – national history, social regulation, transnational enterprise, patriarchy – makes an obvious if silent allusion to Jean-François Lyotard’s distinction between the grand and petit narratives of history.27 In The God of Small Things, a tale of damaged lineages and dispossession, it is predictably in relation to the smaller, peripheral spaces that the lives of women, children and dalits are plotted

in Stories of women
Open Access (free)
What does race have to do with the Yugoslav region?
Catherine Baker

conflated ‘nation’ and ‘race’; the book still did not disentangle their relationship or historicise how global formations of ‘race’ might have influenced specific instances of ‘nation’ over the decades when nationhood in eastern Europe, including the Yugoslav region, became an organising principle of statehood and society. Postsocialist feminism, acknowledging the mutually constitutive relationship of ethnonationalism and patriarchy as nationalist governments largely replaced state socialist regimes across eastern Europe after 1989, was not only at the

in Race and the Yugoslav region
Open Access (free)
Tony Fitzpatrick

invites either a passivity in the face of social injustice, e.g. patriarchy is often attributed to innate biological differences, or simplistic approaches to genetic engineering, and often both at the same time (Ridley, 1999: 217–18, 253). The Critical Darwinians therefore draw our attention to the superficial ways in which reductionism deals with environmental factors; genes, in Wilson’s (1978: 172) famous phrase, ‘hold culture on a leash’ and Dawkins (1989: 189–201) went as far as proposing that there is a cultural equivalent of the gene, the ‘meme’ (Blackmore, 1999

in After the new social democracy
Open Access (free)
What lovers want
Arlyn Diamond

finding any particular source. However, the wall paintings or statues in French romances or Chaucer’s dream visions act to reinforce the text’s themes – the story of Dido and Aeneas, statues of Venus, scenes from the Romance of the Rose – in a way which does not seem to happen here. The details are too abstract and confused to allow for an iconographic analysis, but it is clear that they have nothing to do with stories of lovers, nor do they have any particular female associations – no Mary, no female saints, just unrelieved patriarchy. I would like to suggest two other

in Pulp fictions of medieval England
Le Bone Florence of Rome and bourgeois self-making
Felicity Riddy

kidnapper – violence against women takes many forms in this poem – can only get away with it for so long, because their bodies will do for them in the end. This is the unspoken knowledge of the home, which sees patriarchy at its most vulnerable and from very close up. Florence insists that before she will heal them they must make public confession, and so one by one they tell the stories of their crimes which, patched together, are Florence’s own horrific history. Then, unflinchingly, ‘Sche handylde πem wyth hur hande’ (2110) – the black sores, the shaking limbs, the

in Pulp fictions of medieval England