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Beckett and nothing: trying to understand Beckett
Daniela Caselli

: Better one. Stronger.’ This ‘abandoned work’ echoes incipits from Waiting for Godot (E: ‘nothing to be done’) to Endgame (C: ‘Finished, it’s finished, nearly finished, it must be nearly finished’) via the desire for exhaustion of the Texts for Nothing and some of the Fizzles. However, it also, and perhaps more heavy-handedly than both Worstward Ho and What Is the Word, reads as a ‘caricature of the labour of composition’, and in this respect Cohn’s analogy 4 Beckett and nothing with Catastrophe and Fragment du théâtre II stands: ‘Ten words two mistakes’, P drily

in Beckett and nothing
Open Access (free)
Caring performance, performing care
Amanda Stuart Fisher

popular media in recent years. 3 In this way, the play dismantles the label of ‘unaccompanied minor’, transforming these young men into people with whom we can relate and, crucially, care for . Furthermore, the play moves beyond simple representations of acts of caring. Methodologically and dramaturgically, Dear Home Office performs a mode of care for its actors and a deep respect for these young men’s experiences. Borrowing from theatre maker Peter Sellars the play moves beyond ‘the furtive and presumptuous look of the culture of surveillance’ and instead generates

in Performing care
Open Access (free)
Fluidity and reciprocity in the performance of caring in Fevered Sleep’s Men & Girls Dance
Amanda Stuart Fisher

, drawing attention not only to the self–other relationship at hand, but also to a sense of shared humanness and an interrelatedness that connects us with other people. In these exchanges of observation and description, personal boundaries and consent were respected and carefully negotiated. The moments of touch, for example, focused only on arms and backs and were carefully and sensitively carried out. The language adopted to describe what was observed then became semi-ritualised, following a predetermined pattern that added to its meditative quality and always starting

in Performing care
Open Access (free)
The art of performance and her work in film
Katharine Cockin

so well and so continually that she never listened, and consequently never learnt anything except her stage parts, with the result that to the day of her quite recent death she spoke of Irving as a ridiculous young pretender, and of the cinema as a vulgar penny gaff with which no self-respecting player could possibly be connected.5 Shaw implied that Terry (unlike Kendal) was prepared to listen, learn and adapt herself to new performance challenges. His respect for Terry’s breadth of knowledge of the theatrical arts is demonstrated by his extensive consultation

in Stage women, 1900–50
Open Access (free)
Margaret Rutherford
John Stokes

that this was also an age of strikes. When Rutherford takes the initiative, she is still like a military or political leader, either ‘battle axe or Amazon’ (a phrase that occurs), although capable of blackmail. In the film version the part of the headmaster was played by Alastair Sim, which pitted her masculine forcefulness, however manic, against his feminine dithering. At one point Sim actually becomes her secretary, taking down dictation. In this respect Happiest Days looked forward to the popular St Trinian’s series and, in fact, its opening titles are by the

in Stage women, 1900–50
Open Access (free)
Working memory
David Calder

a key respect. Whereas Assmann equates working memory with canonicity and therefore with durable, lasting value (even as she acknowledges that material may pass in and out of a culture’s canon), I emphasize working memory’s provisional, temporary nature. In my estimation, working memory maintains the past as present, but it also suggests an ultimately fictional endpoint at which the past will be laid to rest. To borrow again from psychology, if working memory enables a pupil to calculate a string of figures, to work with information already received, modifying it

in Street theatre and the production of postindustrial space
Open Access (free)
Fetters of an American farmgirl
R.J. Ellis

, then, by identifying how this pastoral‘escalator’, moving away from emerging issues of class on both sides of the Atlantic, is one upon which Our Nig’s dislocations of fictional representations of farm life conspicuously do not stand. Our Nig: fetters of an American farmgirl 67 One starting point in this respect, if not an obvious one, is Elizabeth Gaskell’s Cousin Phillis, a near-contemporaneous novella published in 1864.14 This offers a rare fictional account of a female working in the fields. Cousin Phillis is not working class, but she is the daughter of a farfrom

in Special relationships
Sarah Orne Jewett, The Tory Lover, and Walter Scott, Waverley
Alison Easton

triumph, Loyalist/Patriot divisions had been a standard subject for fiction in the nineteenth century.8 Jewett capitalises upon this in her own way as a means of exploring the nation’s continuing internal power struggles. With the Revolutionary period she could work with a respected society that was none the less both unambiguously stratified by class (unlike the subsequent veiling of class division in the prevailing national ideology), as well as by ‘race’ and gender. This classed society could be represented as interactive and nuanced in the way that a society

in Special relationships
T.S. Eliot and Gothic hauntings in Waugh’s A Handful of Dust and Barnes’s Nightwood
Avril Horner and Sue Zlosnik

suggest, then, that the effect of Waugh’s borrowings from and debts to Eliot’s work is to foreground the Gothic strain within Eliot’s own writing. A Handful of Dust both lightly nods to the moment of high Modernism whilst pillaging the Gothic tradition for the appropriate tropes and motifs with which to represent the alienation inherent in the modern condition. Moreover, the Gothic element in Eliot’s poetry – which his critical silence in this respect obscures as an intellectual legacy – is made entirely evident in Waugh’s novel. A Handful of Dust, in making us conscious

in Special relationships
Foregrounding the body and performance in plays by Gina Moxley, Emma Donoghue and Marina Carr
Mária Kurdi

of Ireland to ensure their gender equality, a positive result of EU membership in this respect. Entrenched as it is in far-reaching traditions, however, the socio-cultural construction of woman shows less flexibility. As Pat O’Connor points out, in spite of all visible improvements women continue to be seen, effectively, as ‘outlaws’ – people who are ‘different’, ‘suspect’, ‘not like us’, people whose loyalty to ‘the system’ is problematic. . . . Women in Ireland, regardless of their age, life stage, ascribed class position and participation in paid employment, are

in Irish literature since 1990