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Contextualising colonial and post-colonial nursing

four chapters begin to examine the embedding of Western-style nursing culture into indigenous cultures. These chapters widen our scope beyond the British Empire to include not only Australia and New Zealand, but also the Dutch East Indies and the American colonies of Puerto Rico and the Philippines. Issues such as racism and clashes of culture now come to the fore. The tensions between colonial nurses and their ‘Western’ culture of medicine and the traditional practices of indigenous trainees 3 Helen Sweet and Sue Hawkins and their patients are examined, as are

in Colonial caring
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Empire, migration and the 1928 English Schoolgirl Tour

idea for Empire tours had begun in the early 1920s when, following a visit to England by the Young Australian League, a reciprocal visit to Australia was sponsored by the Church of England Council of Empire Settlement. There were grand plans to send 200 boys from English public schools on tours of the Empire. 9 Along with the headmasters of public schools, Colonel Amery was on the schools’ Empire tour

in Female imperialism and national identity
Where and when does the violence end?

, especially former European settler societies with a sizeable proportion of their populations self-​identifying as Indigenous persons, such as Australia and New Zealand, have also taken measures that favour repatriation of human remains. In Australia, for example, these include pieces of state legislation, such as the Queensland Torres Strait Islander Cultural Heritage Act 2003 and the Victoria Aboriginal Cultural Heritage Act 2006, along with a joint Commonwealth Government and States Government Return of Cultural Property Program.23 These, in turn, have encouraged various

in Human remains in society
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Nursing work and nurses’ space in the Second World War: a gendered construction

recognise the importance of the nursing sisters’ wartime presence,36 whilst valuable as books that write nurses back into the narrative of the war’s medical provision, do not do full service to their essential work. There are a range of more critical texts about nursing in war in general, but little on the Second World War specifically. Jan Bassett, Mary Sarnecky and Anna Rogers have written highly empirical monographs about Australian, US and New Zealand army nurses, but they cover over 100 years of service.37 Over recent years there has been a proliferation of work on

in Negotiating nursing
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This volume is the culmination of a project begun in the sixty-first year of the reign of Queen Elizabeth II, Head of the Commonwealth and Queen Regnant of the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia and New Zealand, as well as several Caribbean countries, Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands and Tuvalu. Among the many public celebrations that marked that Diamond Jubilee year, the Queen opened the 2012 Summer

in The British monarchy on screen
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all, the country most affected by nineteenth-century Irish emigration was not the United States, where the largest proportion of emigrants went, nor Australia, which had a higher ratio of immigrants from Ireland among its population than from any other country, but Ireland itself, from where all of them ultimately came. This study proposes to improve our understanding of the phenomenon of Irish emigration by concentrating on Ireland rather than its diaspora, and within those parameters to look at a significant and hitherto overlooked aspect of the two

in Population, providence and empire
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Sarah Bernhardt, Queen Elizabeth and the development of motion pictures

. National Film and Sound Archive of Australia. It is not just the formal language of Bernhardt’s film but the very performance of British monarchy on screen that prompts Queen Elizabeth ’s ongoing association with an haute bourgeois theatrical culture that had no place in early film. The irony, of course, is that it is only on screen that it might be argued that

in The British monarchy on screen

subsequent eruption of violence, the Security Council authorised an Australian-led multinational force (INTERFET) to restore peace and security and to facilitate humanitarian assistance operations. 9 In this episode, Australia no doubt pursued its regional foreign policy (with the blessing of the United States), while a transnational coalition of civil society organisations pursued either their human rights programmes or

in The United Nations, intra-state peacekeeping and normative change
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. They trained nurses who wanted not only to work in healthcare but also to serve their country. Protestant missionaries set up hospitals and training schools on the island in part to undermine the position of the Catholic Church. Thus in this case, for better or for worse, nurses served to transform healthcare and society. In Australia, the goal was to ‘civilise’ the Aboriginals, who were described as ‘savages’. Aboriginal healthcare and midwifery practices were discounted. With the presence of plague in Hong Kong, British doctors and nurses insisted that only

in Colonial caring
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diversity and the multicultural policies adopted by Australia and Canada in the 1970s, to name just three examples. In the 1980s communitarian writers embraced the culture-friendly virtues of solidarity, togetherness and belonging, but ironically, while community was prized as homely and familiar, it was never spelt out which communities – cultural or otherwise – were being invoked. Only in the early 1990s did the liberal

in Political concepts