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Christine E. Hallett

. Six weeks before her death, in 1948, she was promoted to the rank of colonel (retired).32 For Julia Stimson, there were no barriers to success or advancement. Her remarkable sense of duty and her capacity for working within the systems devised by others – and for making those systems work, through the force of her charisma and personality – ensured that she enjoyed a level of success and a recognition not afforded to many nurses in the first half of the twentieth century. Pioneer nurse: the adventures of Helen Dore Boylston Many US nurses appear to have relished

in Nurse Writers of the Great War
Open Access (free)
Christine E. Hallett

, anticipating challenge, but found horror and despair. When she first began nursing, she exclaimed in her diary: ‘Oh! I love the British Tommy! I shall get so fond of these men I know. And when I look after any one of them, it is like nursing Roland by proxy.’25 But, after Roland’s death, she found that she hated the work. Claire Tylee has commented on the ‘mental flannel’ – the curious combination of innate innocence and susceptibility to propaganda that encouraged women like Brittain to romanticise the war until affected personally by its consequences.26 At both the

in Nurse Writers of the Great War
Open Access (free)
Nursing work and nurses’ space in the Second World War: a gendered construction
Jane Brooks

one that all nurses followed, nor one that was linear. Rather individual nurses shifted practice as they developed skills and strategies to support their soldier-patients as demanded by the exigencies of war and the challenges that presented in various times and places. Chapter 1 examines the fundamental nursing work of body and comfort care, feeding work and clinical nursing skills in the face of pain, distress and death. This was care work that all nurses learnt in their hospital training. On active service overseas this work was reformed to provide a more humane

in Negotiating nursing
Open Access (free)
Duncan Wilson

Kantian metaphysics to beat back criticisms by anyone … who might object strenuously’.38 In the same vein, Jonathan Imber dismissed bioethics as little more than ‘the public relations division of modern medicine’.39 But these critiques fail to identify the mechanisms that underpin the emergence of bioethics in specific times and places, and how these lead to some issues and not others being designated as ‘bioethical’. ‘The mere presence of illness, death, medical technology, and professional decision making do not in and of themselves necessitate bioethics’, Nikolas

in The making of British bioethics
Britta Lundgren and Martin Holmberg

decreased dramatically during the nineteenth century, although there were still small regular outbreaks. But by the end of the century, there were hardly any smallpox deaths. There were a few isolated occurrences during the twentieth century, with the last one in 1963, affecting twenty-seven persons in the Stockholm area. This led to the voluntary mass vaccination of more than 300,000 people. 8 This mass vaccination resulted in a few serious

in The politics of vaccination
Nursing and medical records in the Imperial War in Ethiopia (1935–36)
Anna La Torre, Giancarlo Celeri Bellotti and Cecilia Sironi

the crowds: ‘The Italian people have created the Empire with their blood’, he professed; and ‘That commits you in front of God and in front of men for life and death.’11 Such speeches have been considered by historians as a prelude to the Second World War. The organisation of Army healthcare during the campaign, 1935–36 The main official documents relating to health in the Italian Empire are L’importanza dell’organizzazione sanitaria nella Guerra d’Etiopia (The 170 A sample of Italian Fascist colonialism importance of health organisation during the Ethiopian

in Colonial caring
Christine E. Hallett

would support her work.31 On her father’s death in 1906, she inherited a share of his fortune. When she graduated from Vassar in 1907, she was persuaded by her mother to use some of her wealth to travel the world, visiting Christian mission stations. In Lahore she met Douglas Turner, the man who would become her first husband. Engaged to him within a week of their first meeting, she appears to have had doubts about the relationship, but married him in Lausanne, on 28 August 1908.32 Moving to London in 1913, Borden began to publish novels under the pseudonym Bridget

in Nurse Writers of the Great War
Jane Brooks

work). With them as a group, I fell in love, married one, worked in the hospital for 23 years and lived happily ever after.’63 Sister Helen Luker also returned to hospital nursing. She was first appointed as the tutor for the preliminary training school of the Nightingale School of Nursing at St Thomas’ Hospital, where she herself had trained. Later she went to St Thomas’ country hospital, Hydestile, as Sister-­in-­Charge. Luker was still in post when, in May 1957, she suffered a seizure and died.64 Although Luker’s career ended in her early death, both she and

in Negotiating nursing
A national ethics committee and bioethics during the 1990s
Duncan Wilson

most obvious in medicine, where the new government promised to use what it called ‘clinical governance’ Consolidating the ‘ethics industry’ 235 to construct a ‘healthcare service built around the patient’.121 Its enthusiasm for external oversight and ‘empowered consumers’ was given impetus by the disclosure of malpractice at Bristol Royal Infirmary in October 1997, which Rudolf Klein claims ‘transformed the policy landscape as far as relations between the State and medicine were concerned’.122 The case centred on the deaths of twentynine babies and young

in The making of British bioethics
So what went wrong?
Odette Best

(which were introduced into Australia by the settler population).30 Johnson’s report also stated: The housing was inadequate, and the buildings cold and draughty. Many Aboriginals slept on the ground in winter, and the blanket issue was insufficient. In January alone there were 31 deaths the majority of which were due to gastro-enteritis and pneumonia, both of which are preventable by adequate diet and living conditions.31 111 Odette Best 5.1  Half-caste dormitory In reporting on the staff at Woorabinda, he further noted that the appalling conditions and high death

in Colonial caring