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Markets, embeddedness and trust

Problems of polysemy and idealism

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Andrew Sayer

2 Markets, embeddedness and trust: problems of polysemy and idealism Andrew Sayer Introduction In this paper I develop a critique of certain approaches to markets and firm behaviour in economics and economic sociology. There are two main targets of the critique. The first concerns some common approaches to markets and the nature of firms in relation to them. Here I argue that the diverse uses of the term ‘market’ in contemporary lay and academic discourse cause confusion. Also problematic in both mainstream and institutional economics is the tendency to treat

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Sabine Clarke

and practice after 1940 was therefore a combination of idealism and exploitation. In the wake of the 1940 CDW Act, the Colonial Office made a commitment to the development of secondary industry in the Caribbean. L. J. Butler remains the only historian to have considered in any detail the Colonial Office’s policy for industrialisation. 28 His focus was on the drive for import-substitution industries in West Africa and no account exists of plans for the British Caribbean. Indeed, historians of the Caribbean generally deny that Britain ever had such a vision. The

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Katie Pickles

Columbia, named for the painter, and the Pauline Johnson Chapter named for the native Canadian poet. In an annual ceremony members placed daffodils, her favourite flower, on her monument in Stanley Park, and then took tea. 75 In their promotion of Anglo-Canadian identity, chapter names evoked a sense of idealism, of a romantic chivalry that extended to the dramatic idea of being a Daughter of the Empire

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The movie-made Movement

Civil rites of passage

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Sharon Monteith

protagonists undergo a rites of passage or racial conversion. Most white directors and screenwriters espouse a liberal reformist vision in working out private salvations. But as Martin Luther King Jr. opined in Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community? (1967), liberalism can be ‘all too sentimental concerning human nature’, leaning towards a ‘false idealism’. Films made in our own historical moment

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Christine E. Hallett

was drawn to the war by a belief that it was a noble cause in which a heroic generation was sacrificing itself for the good of all.32 It was only later that she realised that ‘naïve idealism … had been both the virtue and the fatal weakness of her generation’.33 Brittain herself commented in her later autobiography, Testament of Experience, that her experience in the ‘German Ward’ had set her on the path to pacifism and work for the League of Nations.34 In Testament of Youth, she recalled the vulnerability of her German prisoner-patients, and her sense of a common

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Johan Östling

. The opinion of Habermas, quoting K. Reumann, was that ‘the assertion of unbroken fidelity to Humboldt is the existential self-deception of our universities’. This verdict, however, did not stop Habermas from devoting a large portion of his statement to scrutinising idealism and the ideas of the early 1960s.5 On the other hand, Habermas criticised theories of the kind employed by Niklas Luhmann, theories in which research and higher education merely became elements in a system and not part of the life-world. His own proposal for how the university should be adapted

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M. Anne Brown

underlying principles for policy orientations in particular fields to a search for deeper justification at the level of ultimate things. This second level of Linklater’s text, and the second way in which universalism figures in the text, thus refers to universal reason and a universal communication community, where ‘all individuals should be regarded as if they were co-legislators in a universal moral community’ (1998: 37). As with the patterns of idealism discussed in chapter 2 , a central role is given to theory as the transformative agent and vehicle of truth. This is

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Cas Mudde

War. (VLN 5/81) Collaboration and the post-war ‘repression’ are judged from a purely nationalistic perspective by the VB. On the one hand, the party speaks of ‘those who, for the good of the population, have held a political or administrative office during the Second World War’ (Verreycken 1993: 16), and refers to the former Eastern Front combatants as ‘soldiers … who, fifty years ago, driven through idealism, wanted to fight the madness of communism’ (Verreycken 1993: 8). On the other hand, it portrays the repression as ‘blind persecution [by] anti

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Johan Östling

‘to form’ or ‘to shape’. It was in the decades surrounding the year 1800 that the word had a real impact on the debate of ideas and in the consciousness of the emerging educated middle classes (Bildungsbürgertum). Even if it appeared in various guises, their common sustenance was the specific combination of German New Humanism, Enlightenment thought, and idealism that characterised the intellectual climate in German-speaking Europe at that time. It is significant that Bildung lacks a direct equivalent in other major languages. Translations such 25  Wilhelm von

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Rachel E. Hile

to hir, penurie” (lines 299–300). When Nashe refers to the earlier sources, he uses the allusion to provide a contrast or implied critique of the idealism and innocence of the earlier texts. Where love/Love is found differs importantly but not randomly in these poems. Spenser alters his sources’ box tree into an “Yvie todde.” Leo Spitzer hypothesizes that Spenser’s innovation stems from a “desire not only to acclimate our episode in England, but also to enforce the ‘dormant’ aspect of Love … the statue of Cupid covered with ivy represents then the minimum of Love