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-funded research would enable Britain’s Caribbean colonies to participate in the emerging ‘brave new synthetic world’, and in doing so these places would find their economic fortunes revived. 2 By exploring post-war visions of economic development for the British Caribbean colonies this work produces a rethinking of our wider understanding of the history of science and development in the twentieth century. Despite the rise of development as a universal ideal for the Global South and the emergence of development studies as a major scholarly field, we employ a narrative of past

in Science at the end of empire

felt, was unsustainable. The answer was to train nurses ‘who had held the post of sister in a ward or operating theatre’ to give anaesthetics.115 They would not supplant honorary anaesthetists, but would support the work of their colleagues in the operating theatres and, therefore, their patients. The decision caused uproar. Nurses had been employed to act as anaesthetists by the British military on active service overseas in the First World War, but the practice had ceased in the aftermath of that earlier conflict.116 The Americans had continued to use nurse

in Negotiating nursing
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and the United States. 8 In their coverage of the relationship over first two post-war decades, most writers do tend to regard the adjective ‘special’ as at least partially warranted. The American academic and foreign policy practitioner Henry Kissinger, for example, notes how effectively British diplomats brought their influence to bear upon American policymakers. There were ‘meetings so regular that autonomous American

in A ‘special relationship’?
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memoirs, a new group of female writers – among whom Vera Brittain was probably the most successful – began to publish books about their wartime experiences.5 These early memoirs ended a ten year ‘silence’ during which very little had been written about the war, and set the tone and content of later generations’ understandings of the conflict. But, for the first post-war generation, remembrance was complicated by the looming possibility of another European conflict. During and immediately after the Second World War, the world’s focus was on a very different form of

in Nurse Writers of the Great War

of Nonconformist religious Vic02 10/15/03 2:10 PM Page 35 MAIN POLITICAL INFLUENCES 35 origins.’5 It believed strongly in international and working-class solidarity, and saw the British empire as exploitative. For the ILP, domestic and foreign policy were parts of a whole, with social reform at home requiring the projection of democratic ideals abroad. It was largely pacifist, believed in international co-operation, was against overt militarism and war, and believed that an end to secret diplomacy could mean an end to international conflict.6 Both Kenneth O

in The Labour Party and the world, volume 1
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tendency towards glossing over bad news and exaggerating favourable news persisted. The Air Ministry’s figures for German and British losses during the Battle of Britain, ineluctably passed on by the media, are a case in point. A post-war calculation put the overstatement of the British case at 55 per cent.8 As for the bombing, the public was denied all but the most sketchy details of the location of raids and the extent of the casualties and damage. In radio bulletins and newspaper reports casualties were given as ‘slight’, ‘considerable’ or ‘heavy’ and in newsreel

in Half the battle
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Conclusion In addition to a dawning comprehension of what had occurred, the chief legacy of the Great War was change. On 2 September 1914 The Times printed for the first time Rudyard Kipling’s poem ‘For All We Have and Are’ in which the nation’s poet lamented that, ‘Our world has passed away/In wantonness o’erthrown’, the only solid things remaining being ‘steel and fire and stone’. If the realities of war focused attention on the basic elements of existence and survival, the well-spring of grief and self-examination that characterised the post-war world did not

in A war of individuals
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contribution to the war: nursing work in military hospitals. Rathbone’s purpose in writing the novel was undoubtedly to record the contributions of young women to the British nation during the First World War, and to inform a post-war generation of the significance of their service. A sense of the suffering endured by the war generation – both male and female – suffuses the book. In reading it, one senses that Rathbone felt compelled to record the sadness and horror behind the experiences of those who were young at the time of the war. In this sense, her novel is a classic

in Nurse Writers of the Great War
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themselves subsumed into that of ‘being female’.6 This led to the precarious 93 Negotiating nursing image in which nurses’ chief contribution to the war effort could be seen in terms of their gender.7 Nursing sisters in the Second World War were aware of their gendered position as morale boosters, but they did not always see this as a denigration of their professional and clinical skills. They openly used themselves therapeutically within their clinical routines and understood the essential nature of their presence ‘when technology reached its limits’.8 As British women

in Negotiating nursing

Islam (and of people with brown and Muslim bodies crossing borders) depended on pre-9/11 Western cultural racism. Even more deeply, the history of the Second World War's North Atlantic alliance that gave NATO its founding myth itself carries a vestigial whiteness if seen in continuity with the ‘racialized peace’ already forged, Srđan Vučetić ( 2011 ) argues, by Britain and the USA (later including France) at the fin-de-siècle. Post-Yugoslav politicians and Atlanticist commentators primarily described their militaries' roles in Iraq and Afghanistan

in Race and the Yugoslav region