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Sabine Clarke

industry was prompted by the crisis in the British Empire in the 1930s. The Great Depression had shown that too many of Britain’s colonies were dependent on a narrow range of agricultural exports, making them highly vulnerable to the fluctuations of the world market. 6 The encouragement of colonial industry was a way to solve the issues of unemployment and low living standards. In further contrast to the recommendations of the interwar period, Stanley claimed that the new policy for industrialisation would not prioritise the interests of British manufacturers. New

in Science at the end of empire
Open Access (free)
Saving the White voters from being ‘utterly swamped’
Julie Evans, Patricia Grimshaw, David Philips, and Shurlee Swain

; in Kimberley, he found himself part of an educated African elite, mostly missionary-educated Xhosa-speakers from the eastern Cape, who used their literacy skills to get clerical positions. As Kimberley was in the Cape, they were all qualified for, and took seriously their exercise of, the vote. 20 This made them strong supporters of the British Empire and of the Cape Colony against the Boer republics

in Equal subjects, unequal rights
Open Access (free)
Women, internal colonization and indigenous peoples
Katie Pickles

on a “preponderance of British citizens amongst those admitted to the country” means that we are in favour of admitting people from the West Indies, India, Pakistan and the Commonwealth Countries in preference to people from the Netherlands, Denmark, Germany etc.’ 13 In the 1920s, when only a minority of the subjects of the British Empire were ‘white’, ‘coloured’ people were blocked from

in Female imperialism and national identity
Organizing principles, 1900–1919
Katie Pickles

detracted from that twenty-five years… they covered so much in … [those] years’. 84 Indeed, the IODE’s organizing principles would shift over the century, but the formative years provided the base that, as the rest of this book will show, remained of importance in its attitudes towards gender, race and class. The war also solidified the IODE’s sense of national identity, albeit within the British Empire

in Female imperialism and national identity
Open Access (free)
‘Australia for the White Man’
Julie Evans, Patricia Grimshaw, David Philips, and Shurlee Swain

), Women’s Suffrage in the British Empire: Citizenship, Nation and Race (London and New York: Routledge, 2000), pp. 87–102. 30 Auckland Star , 9 August 1893, p. 2. 31 See Patricia Grimshaw, Women’s Suffrage in New Zealand

in Equal subjects, unequal rights
Sabine Clarke

industrialisation through work in microbiology. The CMRI developed food yeast, surveyed the microbes in tropical soils for antibiotic effects, looked for a way to tackle Panama Disease in bananas and worked to improve the industrial processes of cocoa fermentation and rum distillation. The significance of the creation of the first microbiological research centre in the tropical British Empire was exhorted by Hankey in his speech at the opening of the CMRI on 5 July 1948, in articles in the Trinidad Guardian and also by Simonsen in a BBC broadcast in the spring of 1948. Three

in Science at the end of empire
Open Access (free)
Kirsti Bohata, Alexandra Jones, Mike Mantin, and Steven Thompson

experienced by men or by women, would likely have most affected women care givers, at least in the early years. In expanding the category of work and considering disability in relation to work, this study builds on a special issue of Disability Studies Quarterly on ‘Disability, Work and Representation: New Perspectives’.25 If women’s experiences have been ignored, so too has the ethnic diversity of the coalfields been overlooked. The coalfields were far from ethnically homogeneous. Immigration from Ireland, Poland and the British empire was widespread as work in the

in Disability in industrial Britain
Open Access (free)
Mike Huggins

American Cambridge undergraduate. Other Americans included the 1926 National winner’s owner, A. C. Schwartz, who had bought the horse at a very high price only three weeks before in an attempt to win the race. Owners from the British Empire also played a significant role. A key group here came from the Indian Breeders and owners sub-continent. The Aga Khan, the most successful owner-breeder of the period, with studs in Ireland and France as well as in England, raced on a huge scale, and was regularly leading owner and leading breeder. He had a commercial approach to

in Horseracing and the British 1919–39
The Tokyo trial of Japanese leaders, 1946–48
Peter Lowe

, and the United States. The Truman administration was originally unwilling to include India but eventually agreed that an Indian judge should be nominated (India was part of the British empire in 1946 and became an independent state in 1947).15 One of the obvious problems, and subsequently a cause of fundamental criticism, was the composition of the IMTFE: all of the judges came from countries hostile to Japan (admittedly, it was more complicated in the case of India where some Indians had fought against Britain in association with Japan but far more Indians fought

in Domestic and international trials, 1700–2000
Heloise Brown

all armed forces, with a view to their eventual abolition.6 Peckover edited and indeed funded the journal for nearly fifty years, until her death in 1931. It was for the most part a single-issue, Evangelical journal, focused around Christian, absolute pacifism and the progress of the peace movement across the world. However, it also included critiques of the oppression and domination that was being practised across the British empire. Like Peckover herself, Peace and Goodwill bypassed questions relating to the women’s movement, such as the suffrage, and argued

in ‘The truest form of patriotism’