Jules B. Farber

Rather than write a classic biography of James Baldwin in the last cycle of his life—from his arrival in 1970 as a black stranger in the all-white medieval village of Saint-Paul, until his death there in 1987—I sought to discover the author through the eyes of people who knew him in this period. With this optic, I sought a wide variety of people who were in some way part of his life there: friends, lovers, barmen, writers, artists, taxi drivers, his doctors and others who retained memories of their encounters with Baldwin on all levels. Besides the many locals, contact was made with a number of Baldwin’s further afield cultural figures including Maya Angelou, Harry Belafonte, Sidney Poitier, Angela Davis, Bill Wyman, and others. There were more than seventy interviews in person in places as distant as Paris, New York or Istanbul and by telephone spread over four years during the preparatory research and writing of the manuscript. Many of the recollections centred on “at home with Jimmy” or dining at his “Welcome Table.”

James Baldwin Review
An Interview with Raoul Peck
Leah Mirakhor

I Am Not Your Negro (2016) takes its direction from the notes for a book entitled “Remember this House” that James Baldwin left unfinished, a book about his three friends—Medgar Evers, Malcolm X, and Martin Luther King Jr.— their murders, and their intertwining legacies. The film examines the prophetic shadow Baldwin’s work casts on twentieth- and twenty-first-century American politics and culture. Peck compiles archival material from Baldwin’s interviews on The Dick Cavett Show, his 1965 Cambridge lecture, and a series of banal images indexing the American dream. Juxtaposed against this mythology is footage of Dorothy Counts walking to school, the assassination of black leaders and activists, KKK rallies, and the different formations of the contemporary carceral state. Our conversation examines Peck’s role as a filmmaker and his relationship with the Baldwin estate. Additionally, we discussed a series of aesthetic choices he fought to include in the film’s final cut, directing Samuel L. Jackson as the voice for the film, the similarities and shifts he wanted to document in American culture since the 1960s, and some of the criticism he has received for not emphasizing more Baldwin’s sexuality.

James Baldwin Review
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1 1 1 1 Introduction Baltimore is Still Burning The Rising Relevance of James Baldwin Joyce Justin A. Field Douglas McBride Dwight A. 09 2015 1 1 1 1 1 1 9 9 10.7227/JBR.1.1 Essays “But Amen is the Price” James Baldwin and Ray Charles in “The Hallelujah Chorus” Pavlić Ed 09 2015 1 1 1 1 10 10 40 40 10.7227/JBR.1

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2 2 1 1 Introduction Lorem Ipsum Paris Joyce Justin A justin-joyce@northwestern.edu Field Douglas douglas.field@manchester.ac.uk McBride Dwight A dwight-mcbride@northwestern.edu 09 2016 2 2 1 1 1 1 5 5 10.7227/JBR.2.1 Essays I've Got a Testimony James Baldwin and the Broken Silences of Black Queer Men Melton McKinley E mmelton

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“No Chart Can Tell Us” Ordinary Intimacies in Emerson, Du Bois, and Baldwin Clark Prentiss 9 2019 5 5 1 1 23 23 47 47 10.7227/JBR.5.3 Strangers in the Village James Baldwin, Teju Cole, and Glenn Ligon Gehlawat Monika 9 2019 5 5 1 1 48 48 72 72 10.7227/JBR.5.4 Graduate Student Essay Award Beyond Understanding James

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4 4 1 1 Introduction “Perhaps home is not a place but simply an irrevocable condition”: At Home in the Life and Work of James Baldwin Field Douglas 9 2018 4 4 1 1 1 1 7 7 10.7227/JBR.4.1 Essays “So sensual, so languid, and so private” James Baldwin’s American South Fallis Jeff 9 2018 4 4 1 1 8 8 29 29 10.7227/JBR.4.2 Kairotic Time, Recognition, and Freedom in James Baldwin’s Go Tell It on

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3 3 1 1 Introduction In medias res , A Moment of Silence Joyce Justin A. justin.a.joyce@emory.edu 09 2017 3 3 1 1 1 1 8 8 10.7227/JBR.3.1 Essays “Esther Weren’t No Harlot” Rape and Marriage in Go Tell It on the Mountain Nenon Porter pmn2rz@virginia.edu 09 2017 3 3 1 1 9 9 26 26 10.7227/JBR.3.2 Errant Kinship, Traveling Song James Baldwin’s Just Above My Head James

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6 6 1 1 Introduction To Minimize the Bill That They Must Pay Joyce Justin A. 29 9 2020 6 6 1 1 1 1 12 12 1 10.7227/JBR.6.1 Feature Essays The Great Debate James Baldwin, William F. Buckley, Jr., and the Civil Rights Revolution University  Linfield 29 9 2020 6 6 1 1

Open Access (free)

James Baldwin Review (JBR) is an annual journal that brings together a wide array of peer‐reviewed critical and creative non-fiction on the life, writings, and legacy of James Baldwin. In addition to these cutting-edge contributions, each issue contains a review of recent Baldwin scholarship and an award-winning graduate student essay. James Baldwin Review publishes essays that invigorate scholarship on James Baldwin; catalyze explorations of the literary, political, and cultural influence of Baldwin’s writing and political activism; and deepen our understanding and appreciation of this complex and luminary figure.

Open Access (free)
Justin A Joyce, Douglas Field, and Dwight A McBride
James Baldwin Review