Open Access (free)
Collaborations
Hannah Jones, Yasmin Gunaratnam, Gargi Bhattacharyya, William Davies, Sukhwant Dhaliwal, Emma Jackson, and Roiyah Saltus

research team. Our team comprised some people whose experience of activism was street-level and community-facing, while others were more academically based. Some team members already worked within the frameworks of the live (Back and Puwar, 2013 ), inventive (Lury and Wakeford, 2012 ) and real-time (Gunaratnam and Back, 2015 ) style of sociological research that underpinned the study; others were new to

in Go home?
Credibility, dirigisme and globalisation
Ben Clift

reconciled themselves to globalisation whilst retaining dirigiste policy space for egalitarian economic interventionism. Jospin’s policy record, detailed below, offers evidence that the degree of room for governmental manoeuvre is not as heavily circumscribed as the neo-liberal rhetoric of globalisation suggests. The Jospin government’s activism gives the lie to the hyper-global discourse on globalisation. This suggests more complex responses to the process of globalisation in practice than neo-liberal rhetorical deployments of globalisation. To understand the political

in In search of social democracy
Laura Suski

. On the question of consumer action, we can see an intersection in debates in the scholarships around online activism and global humanitarianism. While it is true that global capitalism makes possible material connections between consumers, and while we can be informed of these connections more quickly and easily through digital networks, these connections do not fully explain why we respond to some

in Global humanitarianism and media culture
Open Access (free)
Postfeminist genealogies in millennial culture
Stéphanie Genz

second wave feminism and its collective, activist politics. Postfeminism – meaning in this case post-second wave – came to signal a generational shift in feminist thinking and in understanding social relations between men and women, beyond traditional feminist politics and its supposed threat to heterosexual relationships. Approached in this way, postfeminism could be interpreted as a cyclical process of feminist rejuvenation – emerging after momentous and organized stages (or ‘waves’) of feminist activism and

in Post-everything
Open Access (free)
Strangers among citizens

, but not necessarily the rights associated with that status. Notions of citizenship have been developed within and beyond states in the form of topologies: ‘a topological approach emphasised the proliferation of inside-out and outside-in positions that are produced through the act of delimiting the border’ (Hepworth, 2014 : 112). Examining the positions of Roma through the lens of citizenship studies has been a fruitful endeavour over the last few decades. There have been two main focuses within this work: (1) on Romani activism (Vermeersch

in The Fringes of Citizenship
Open Access (free)
Hannah Jones, Yasmin Gunaratnam, Gargi Bhattacharyya, William Davies, Sukhwant Dhaliwal, Emma Jackson, and Roiyah Saltus

. Hard-hitting government publicity on immigration seemed to provoke new waves of pro-migrant activism. Anger and outrage was translated into online and street-based activism, including by people who had not been engaged in activism before. Some, but not all, activism has been migrant-led, and we identified inequalities in who felt able to take part in political debate because of real or perceived threats to their residency

in Go home?
Open Access (free)
Maggie B. Gale and Kate Dorney

) practitioner, than it would to another study of a female practitioner who has already been ‘researched’. Playwright Susan Glaspell and producer/director Edith Craig are perhaps two notable exceptions here. The series Women, Theatre and Performance was set up in the 2000s precisely to deal with this tension, and has the support of a publisher that is genuinely interested in both expanding and deepening histories of women in the arts. Moreover, there is now a new generation of research on women’s theatre. Naomi Paxton’s Stage Rights! The Actresses’ Franchise League, Activism

in Stage women, 1900–50
Paul Collinson

membership of environmental groups in Ireland is among the lowest of European countries. Also, the Irish government itself was late to recognise the importance of environmental sustainability, in part through an incorporation of EU regulations and programmes focused on the environment (Coyle 1994; Tovey, Share, and Corcoran 2007). These observations provide a partial explanation for the discernible dichotomy between ‘community’ and ‘environmental’ development in Ireland. Although the country has a strong tradition of community activism against the activities of potential

in Alternative countrysides
One Billion Rising, dance and gendered violence
Dana Mills

Baltimore reflected on the event. They wrote: By performing the same choreographed moves to the official ‘One Billion Rising’ theme song, Break the Chain, Hopkins students became part of the global movement to demand an end to GBV.2 Historically, dance has been used a form of activism. However, only recently have people begun to see its power for global activism. Even today, some of the most conservative cultures in the world ban organized dance. It is feared, because it ignites the one thing that you cannot take away from a person: hope. (Branchinia et al. 2013

in Dance and politics
Open Access (free)
Antonia Lucia Dawes

translate for, provide cover for and support other people; how to imagine a better world. These imaginaries eventually animated the ambivalent and partially successful political action the street vendors organised in 2012, a moment that recollected past activism, and prefigured future difficulties. Via Bologna market was subject to another eviction attempt in June 2017, this time, ostensibly, to make space for an underground car park for the railway station. Descriptions of the market as a ‘souk’ and justifications from City Hall about tourism, public order, and

in Race talk