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Neil Macmaster

peoples that were the victim of colonialism and under-development. The US government turned increasingly to academic specialists in the social sciences, including anthropologists, economists and social psychologists, to study the threat and through the 1950s and 1960s they produced an influential model of intervention often referred to as Political Development Theory (PDT).4 The model regarded Third World countries as highly vulnerable to insurgency, according to the adage ‘poverty breeds discontent’, and the role of the US and ‘west’ should be to provide a degree of

in Burning the veil
William Muraskin

-up priority setting is not a minor but a fundamental problem for the ex-colonial world. Most of the South is already caught in a tangle of northern economic investments, disinvestments, bi- and multi-lateral demands, controls, requirements, promises and threats that many have called neo-colonialism. The fact that global immunisation programmes are humanitarian in their aim rather than directly exploitive does not prevent their strongly destructive

in The politics of vaccination
The BBC’s Caribbean Voices
Glyne Griffith

it the prospect of emancipation from colonialism. As Jarrett-Macauley states: She was invited to broadcast morale-boosting talks on West Indians and the war effort: ‘The empire at war and the colonies’ went out on 1 April 1940 and ‘West Indians’ part in war’ later that month. She ended one broadcast: ‘I am

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Sabine Clarke

. 47 TNA, CO 927/88/6. 48 TNA, CO 847/36/4. 49 Lee and Petter, The Colonial Office, War and Development Policy , p. 171; Havinden and Meredith, Colonialism and Development , pp. 204–205; S. Clarke, “A technocratic imperial state? The Colonial Office and scientific research, 1940–1960”, Twentieth Century British History 18(4) (2007), 453–480. 50 TNA, CO 852/588/2; Lee and Petter, The Colonial Office, War and Development Policy , pp. 171–172. 51 M. Worboys, “The

in Science at the end of empire
Sabine Clarke

Second World War: a career in the making”, Canadian Journal of History 16 (1981), 68–85. 10 TNA, CO 852/588/2. 11 Ibid. 12 Ibid. 13 C. Whitham, Bitter Rehearsal: British and American Planning for a Post-War West Indies (Westport: Praeger, 2002), p. 38; C. Fraser, Ambivalent Anti-Colonialism: The United States and the Genesis of West Indian Independence, 1940–1964 (Westport: Greenwood Press, 1994), pp. 59 and 64. 14 Parker

in Science at the end of empire
Neil Macmaster

so as to be able to opt eventually as the winning side became evident. Notes 1 This is a wider theoretical issue addressed constantly by historians of colonialism, ethnographers and ‘subaltern studies’: on Algerian women specifically see ‘Decolonizing Feminism’ in Lazreg, Eloquence, 6–19. 2 The only attempt to analyse the geographical variations in female militancy is Djamila Amrane, ‘Répartition géographique des militantes de la guerre de libération nationale (Algérie, 1954–1962)’, AWAL, 8 (1991), 1–19. M1822 - MACMASTER TEXT.indd 234 21/7/09 12:16:24 Military

in Burning the veil
The intellectual influence of non-medical research on policy and practice in the Colonial Medical Service in Tanganyika and Uganda
Shane Doyle

cultural and moral transformation associated with colonialism, capitalism and Christianity. Controlling such diseases required an intimacy of knowledge of Africans’ domestic and private lives that was considered unnecessary in relation to conditions such as malaria or measles. Acquiring such a depth of understanding of local attitudes and behaviours in Buganda did not require the kind of intense, project

in Beyond the state
Open Access (free)
John Marriott

, neither much tainted by its conditions of production nor transformed by the pragmatics of colonial encounters and struggles’ (Nicholas Thomas, Colonialism’s Culture. Anthropology, Travel and Government , London, Polity Press, 1994, p. 60). 45 Thomas Beames, The Rookeries of London. Past

in The other empire
Open Access (free)
Better ‘the Hottentot at the hustings’ than ‘the Hottentot in the wilds with his gun on his shoulder’
Julie Evans, Patricia Grimshaw, David Philips, and Shurlee Swain

parliament made it more difficult for tribal Africans to register, and not until 1892 that it raised the qualification substantially, with a view to excluding or limiting African voters in the eastern Cape. The last of the Cape frontier wars ended in 1881; with it ended any serious possibility of Indigenes in the Cape defeating White colonialism by military means, and the defeated Xhosa were incorporated into the

in Equal subjects, unequal rights
Missions, the colonial state and constructing a health system in colonial Tanganyika
Michael Jennings

. Notes 1 R.M. Titmuss, The Health Services of Tanganyika: A Report to the Government , London, Pitman Medical Publishing Co., 1964 , p. 1 2 M. Turshen, ‘The Impact of Colonialism on Health and Health Services in Tanzania’, International

in Beyond the state