Colonialism and Native Health nursing in New Zealand, 1900–40
Linda Bryder

Shortly after New Zealand’s Public Health Department was established in 1900, plans were initiated to launch a district nursing service for Maori, largely based on the Queen’s Institute nursing scheme in Britain. The Department regarded the proposal as a cheaper option than existing scheme which subsidised medical practitioners working in districts populated by Maori people. Initially the plan was to train Maori women as ‘Native Health Nurses’ who ‘by precept and example [would] help their countrymen to a good and healthy way of living’. This chapter discusses why it failed and why most the nurses working amongst Maori were European by origin, taking their Western nurse training into their new roles. The chapter focuses on their accounts, often written during epidemics, demonstrating how, to be effective, they had to grasp quickly the importance of compromise and the need to negotiate and interact with local communities. This is not a celebratory account of white nurses and colonial peoples, portraying nurses as fighting the ignorance and superstition of the native race, but does argue that historians should move beyond the victimisation model of history writing based on ‘tool of empire’ discourses to consider afresh the interactions between nurses and their patients.

in Colonial caring
John Marriott

of a Map of Hindustan or the Moguls Empire . It was the first British work to chart details of India’s inland topography instead of maritime routes. Control over land-revenue management gave access to important technical details and Mughal sources of information. 1 Travelogues and associated historical-philosophical surveys appeared, and proved popular. 2 It was at this moment, states Bernard

in The other empire
Open Access (free)
Heloise Brown

pacifist ideas into their wider political analysis of women’s position. Feminists’ ideas of their role within the empire, their eligibility for citizenship and their suitability to act as moral guardians in public life, all made use in varying ways of gendered understandings of the role of force and the relevance of pacifist strategies such as arbitration. As a result, peace ideas had a pervasive influence on the Victorian women’s movement. Recent works by Sandi E. Cooper and Leila J. Rupp have also addressed some of the issues with which this book is concerned. Cooper

in ‘The truest form of patriotism’
War memorials, memory and imperial knowledge
Katie Pickles

war-dead; those ‘sons of the British Empire’ whose heroic sacrifice must not be forgotten and whose dependants must be cared for with dignity. 6 The problem was not confined to the Canadian war-dead. Soldiers from all parts of the Empire lay unidentified in South Africa. It was not long before the newly formed Victoria League attempted to take control of the project – from London. However, because the

in Female imperialism and national identity
Sabine Clarke

exactly was knowledge expected to move from the laboratory and spur development? This chapter will examine the relationship between scientific investigation and colonial development that was embodied in the new arrangements for colonial research that were created in fields such as sugar chemistry during the first half of the 1940s. The late colonial period saw an unprecedented expansion in scientific research across the Colonial Empire and in British universities, funded through the Research Fund of the 1940 CDW Act and its successors. The new

in Science at the end of empire
Heloise Brown

’s suffrage movement and a supporter of the use of physical force in the British empire, was selected by the War Office in 1901 to lead the government enquiry into conditions in the concentration camps. Emily Hobhouse, who had been active in the women’s movement only briefly prior to the war, travelled to South Africa in 1900 to distribute aid in the concentration camps. Although it was her thorough and public criticism of the camps that led to the establishment of the Commission on which Fawcett served, Hobhouse herself was publicly snubbed and pilloried for her ‘pro

in ‘The truest form of patriotism’
Harold Moody and the League of Coloured Peoples
David Killingray

Williams and the Nobel prizewinner, W. Arthur Lewis. 2 But there are many more less well-known figures who contributed to the intellectual life of the Caribbean consistently to challenge prevailing views of race and empire: J. J. Thomas whose brief book Froudacity criticised the prejudices of the eminent English historian James Froude; Samuel Jules Celestine Edwards from Dominica, dead at an early age while editing

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
The pastoral responses of the Irish churches to emigration
Sarah Roddy

James McGregor of Aghadowey, who regarded themselves as leading latter-day Israelites out of oppression and into a land of relative freedom, but, as Kerby Miller has argued, there were also those who admitted to emigrating for essentially careerist reasons. Isaac Taylor of Ardstraw, for one, left owing to 91 Roddy_Population_Printer.indd 91 15/09/2014 11:47 Population, providence and empire ‘the want of necessary support’ from his congregation.5 Consequently, while over a third of clergy in the pre-1750 American Presbyterian Church were Irish-born, after that date

in Population, providence and empire
Open Access (free)
Bill Schwarz

politics, especially a politics which purported to be anti-colonial. ‘On the subject of empire’, he claims, ‘there is only the pamphleteering of churls.’ 5 For Naipaul nothing could be more demeaning; for his compatriot, Padmore, the role of churlish pamphleteer, far from being an insult, signalled virtue and probity. There are hints that whilst in Trinidad Padmore carried some

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Open Access (free)
John Marriott

racial inferiority of non-European peoples’; 35 it also helped to explain why the racialization of the metropolitan poor assumed its most pernicious forms after the 1860s when the immediate crises in imperial rule precipitated by colonial insurrection had been superseded by fears that dissembling processes were operating at the heart of empire. Robert Young has argued skilfully that in the troubled

in The other empire