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‘Australia for the White Man’
Julie Evans, Patricia Grimshaw, David Philips, and Shurlee Swain

desirability of the federation of the Australasian colonies in a speech he gave in the country town of Tenterfield. The British themselves had made such a suggestion on more than one occasion. Parkes now resurrected the idea at a point when enthusiasts for Empire were seriously proposing increased consultation between the mother country and settler colonies – even, perhaps, the formation of an imperial

in Equal subjects, unequal rights
Open Access (free)
Edward M. Spiers

: see W. Walton Claridge, A History of the Gold Coast and Ashanti , 2 vols, 2nd edn (London: Frank Cass, 1964 ), vol. 2, pp. 90–2. 20 ‘A Bluejacket’s Campaign in Ashantee’, Daily News , 25 March 1874, p. 3; see also Commander P. R. Luxmore’s journal, 28 November 1873, quoted in R. Brooks, The Long Arm of Empire: Naval

in The Victorian soldier in Africa
Edward M. Spiers

News , 18 March 1885, p. 8; ‘The Naval Brigade in the Sudan’, Portsmouth Times and Naval Gazette , 18 April 1885, p. 5; Brooks, Long Arm of Empire , p. 189. 27 ‘A Soldier’s Letter’, Daily Telegraph , 12 March 1885, p. 5; Symons, England’s Pride , pp. 173

in The Victorian soldier in Africa
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West Indian intellectual
Helen Carr

distinct, Protestant minority, in a part of the British empire where the majority were poor Catholics, leaving that country as a young adult, and spending a long life elsewhere. He similarly often produced works whose setting was by no means overtly that of his native land. The Irish, however, have had no problem claiming Beckett an Irish writer, even though he went even further than Rhys in his denial of an English

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
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Medical missionaries and government service in Uganda, 1897–1940
Yolana Pringle

government responsibilities and the place of religion, there were no clear guidelines on the appropriateness of their other professional activities. In their published writings, the mission doctors also presented a number of aspects of their day-to-day collaboration with the Colonial Medical Service as examples of the mission’s importance, both for Britain and for the Empire as a whole. This was most overt

in Beyond the state
Sabine Clarke

-of-Spain seat as a candidate for the United Front (UF), beating the famous nationalist leader Uriah Butler, who had contested this seat rather than fight in the oilfield area of the south where his party, the British Empire Workers and Citizens Home Rule Party, had its strongest support. The UF had been formed in early 1946 through the consolidation of a number of left-wing organisations. In 1946, 47 per cent of the population of the colony were black, 35 per cent were East Indian and the remainder were described in the census of that year as mixed, white, Syrian, Chinese or

in Science at the end of empire
Missions, the colonial state and constructing a health system in colonial Tanganyika
Michael Jennings

how we understand colonial welfare policies and services. The easy assumption that welfare was simply a con, softening the hard blow of colonial occupation, becomes harder to maintain when one looks to the diversity of actors engaged in welfare provision. Missions were never simply agents of Empire, and their relationship with imperial aims varies between missions and individual missionaries, and

in Beyond the state
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Feminism, anti-colonialism and a forgotten fight for freedom
Alison Donnell

Studies, The Empire Strikes Back: race and racism in 70s Britain (London: Routledge, 1982). 43 In particular, the Jamaican, Amy Bailey, and Dominican, Phyllis Shand Allfrey, who both spent time in London. 44 Simon Gikandi, ‘Pan-Africanism and

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Claude McKay’s experience and analysis of Britain
Winston James

Party of Great Britain (CPGB). McKay’s job at the Dreadnought entailed covering the volatile labour situation on the London docks, getting news from ‘coloured’ and white seamen. He was also assigned the task of reading the foreign press, with an eye for items about the empire. He wrote book reviews on topics ranging from the shop stewards’ movement to Gorky on Tolstoy; and he published a large

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
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Edward M. Spiers

Tel-el-Kebir in such a short time on that eventful morning’. 112 Notes 1 Brooks, Long Arm of Empire , pp. 171–80. 2 Emery, Marching Over Africa , pp. 187–8. The profusion of letters from the Black Watch may reflect its

in The Victorian soldier in Africa