M. Anne Brown

THIS CHAPTER EXPLORES, through a discussion of one instance, how the principal categories of the Lockean narrative can shape the context for the understanding of and response to political injury. In the case of much Western response to the Beijing massacre the conceptualisation of man and the state is particularly important, as is the related articulation of the realms of ethics and politics. The following discussion of the Beijing killings also questions the adequacy of the terms of the debate between citizenship rights and human rights

in Human rights and the borders of suffering
The quest for the right to science
Marco Cappato

fundamental human rights, such as the right to science and to health. There is another aspect worth noting: the case of drug prohibition is illustrative of how at times rules and laws, particularly restrictive ones, are based on dogma or on unsubstantiated fears (as happened in the case of Galileo), and fail to take into consideration the scientific evidence available, rather than being grounded, as they should be, on a dispassionate analysis of the issues at stake. This method of regulation is not confined to psychoactive substances; cloning and assisted fertilisation, to

in The freedom of scientific research
Felix M. Bivens

13 Interdisciplinary research programme in Chiapas Felix M. Bivens Context The Interdisciplinary Programme on Human Development was launched in 1995. Members of the Autonomous University of Mexico (UAM) Rural Development Programme had been working in the area for some years before that; however, the rise of the Zapatista movement in 1994 caused these academics to refocus their work under a human development approach ‘oriented towards guaranteed human rights to the whole population’ (Cortez Ruiz, 2003, p. 47). The work of the Human Development programme is

in Knowledge, democracy and action
Open Access (free)
‘Case history’ on violence against women, and against women’s rights to health and to reproductive health
Sara De Vido

doctor and the patient.’2 Mutatis mutandis, the role of a lawyer is to investigate case law, and his/her analysis is inevitably influenced by his/her own experience as a scholar. I am using this metaphor to introduce the analysis of the relationship between VAW and human rights to health and to reproductive health, distinguishing the two dimensions of the relationship that constitute the backbone of my argument, and that will frame the notion of VAWH in chapter 2 (the diagnosis). Violence against women’s health does not constitute simply a process of putting together

in Violence against women’s health in international law
Open Access (free)
Neil McNaughton

, Labour wished to bring Britain more into line with European practice in constitutional matters. They therefore proposed the incorporation of the European Convention on Human Rights into British law. In addition a Freedom of Information Act was seen as essential. ● Modernisation. As we have seen above, the Conservative party had done much to modernise the Civil Service during the 1980s and 1990s. The Labour party wished to extend this programme further, but also turned their attention to parliament. Changes in the composition of the House of Lords were a key element

in Understanding British and European political issues
Amikam Nachmani

Turkey’s relations with Europe and the EU have covered a multitude of issues, in particular being heavily involved with economic, political, cultural, ethnic, social, religious, secular and excessive national issues, the democratic process and military interventions in that process, human rights, minority rights, immigration and other aspects. Turkish association with Europe was meant to be the epitome of the country’s integration in the Western civilization; membership in the relevant economic and military bodies (NATO, the EU), the chief

in Turkey: facing a new millennium
Open Access (free)
A conceptualisation of violence against women’s health (VAWH)
Sara De Vido

of the disease over time.1 In my book, these elements have been the judgments of human rights courts and national courts, and the views of UN treaty bodies, related to specific aspects of the relationship between VAW on one hand, and the rights to health and to reproductive health on the other. It should be said that my analysis might seem limited – I looked into around seventy decisions. A database is not the purpose of this book, which aims to reflect on a precise relationship and analyse it using a medical metaphor to achieve a reconceptualisation of states

in Violence against women’s health in international law
Corpse, bodypolitics and contestation in contemporary Guatemala
Ninna Nyberg Sørensen

women (Guatemala Human Rights Commission/USA 2009). The systematic and violent killing of women is generally termed ‘femicide’, when distinguishing the victim of the homicide as female, or ‘feminicide’, when stressing that these women are killed because of their sex, and that not only the male perpetrators but also the state and its judicial structures are responsible for the insecurity of female citizens and the impunity following acts of violence against them. 206 Ninna Nyberg Sørensen The concept of femicide is attributed to Diane Russell, who initially defined

in Governing the dead
Promises and perils
Prashanth Parameswaran

relations with Southeast Asia’s people. But on the other hand, it faced challenges in confronting the reality of China’s growing influence in Southeast Asia, crafting an economic approach for the region, and articulating a clear and comprehensive approach to dealing with democracy and human rights questions. The Trump administration added another layer of complexity to assessing Obama’s legacy in this respect, because while it continued or built on some aspects, it also departed from, and in some cases undermined, others as well. The legacy of US–Southeast Asia

in The United States in the Indo-Pacific
Open Access (free)
M. Anne Brown

AS THE INTRODUCTION to one of the more recent human rights readers notes, the effort to establish or assert ‘ “some particular ground” upon which right-holders can justify their claim to rights … has framed the dominant discourse on human rights’ (Dunne and Wheeler, 1999: 4). Indeed, any discussion of the broader issues raised by human rights seems condemned to endlessly patrol the beat mapped out by the polarities of universal and communitarian or relative grounds for rights and, as Dunne and Wheeler make clear, the associated

in Human rights and the borders of suffering