Open Access (free)
Life and opinions
Brian Pullan and Michele Abendstern

controls in the hope of keeping the Union financially buoyant and within the law, the mainly Conservative Executives of the later 1970s irritated Community Action by suggesting that it keep its paperwork in better order. One General Secretary, it was said, failed to realise ‘that you can’t ask someone who is prepared to stand in the street for three hours giving soup to homeless people to fill in forms in triplicate of how much soup they gave out and who to’. Idealism and accountancy did not mix. But Community Action held together somehow throughout the decade

in A history of the University of Manchester 1973–90
Open Access (free)
Brian Pullan and Michele Abendstern

its staff were young or middle-aged, it would suffer little if the University relied on natural wastage and early retirements, and other, more elderly departments would lose a great deal. Were the professors lacking in moral fibre, fearful of unpopularity, yielding to the threats being uttered by active members of the AUT, who were prominent in their department? For all this there was a kind of idealism in History’s actions, a desire to see law respected and not overridden by the claims of financial necessity, a conviction that imposing redundancies would destroy

in A history of the University of Manchester 1973–90
Brian Pullan and Michele Abendstern

chap 12 23/9/03 1:19 pm Page 268 12 Student culture in the 1980s At intervals journalists, commentators and left-wing politicians would accuse students of losing their idealism, of becoming materialistic and beady-eyed, obsessed with good results and good jobs, addicted to hedonism and pop culture rather than intellectual pursuits. An article demanding ‘Where have all the rebels gone?’ appeared on the twentieth anniversary of the events in Paris in 1968. After the Waddington affair in 1985–86 students seldom resorted to direct action within the University

in A history of the University of Manchester 1973–90
Open Access (free)
Culture, criticism, theory since 1990
Scott Brewster

3000. Visitors from the ‘Eastern Island’ come to consult an oracle in Galway, a region where dwells a colony of long-lived and sagacious people. These ancients have long ago outgrown any sense of Irishness; their predecessors had first exported nationalism to the world so successfully that all national problems were solved, and then returned to Galway having lost their unique selling point, only to find that place no longer satisfied their aspirations. Now bound only to realism, this utopia abjures romantic notions of place and nation. The idealism of the much more

in Irish literature since 1990
Open Access (free)
Cas Mudde

War. (VLN 5/81) Collaboration and the post-war ‘repression’ are judged from a purely nationalistic perspective by the VB. On the one hand, the party speaks of ‘those who, for the good of the population, have held a political or administrative office during the Second World War’ (Verreycken 1993: 16), and refers to the former Eastern Front combatants as ‘soldiers … who, fifty years ago, driven through idealism, wanted to fight the madness of communism’ (Verreycken 1993: 8). On the other hand, it portrays the repression as ‘blind persecution [by] anti

in The ideology of the extreme right
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

during the decade. From the condemnation of Central American foreign policy in Salvador (1986), to the inexorable rise of ‘shock jock’ celebrity culture in Talk Radio (1988), by way of the financial ‘masters of the universe’ satire at the heart of Wall Street (1987), Stone took pot-​ shots at every angle of Reagan’s political philosophy. That the man left the White House in 1989 as one of its most popular ever incumbents, and that films such as Born on the Fourth of July seemed to capture for some audiences the essence of Reagan’s idealism (in as misguided a way as the

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Patrick Doyle

produce and distribute all goods for market. Æ's work for the IAOS, first as an organiser of credit societies and subsequently Homestead editor, trained him to leaven his idealism with pragmatism when it came to the hard work required to win farmers over to the co-operative model. As he wrote: ‘we don't believe the last day will come, or any new Jerusalem appear in the heavens until men have made the most there is to be made out of this old world’. The establishment of a co-operative society represented an occasion pregnant with possibility, as it formed a nucleus

in Civilising rural Ireland
Patrick Doyle

stated the profound dilemma that faced Irish co-operators. As editor of the Irish Homestead he possessed a detailed awareness of the impediments and challenges that co-operators encountered at a national and local level. A decade and a half spent promoting the movement and its brand of economic reform saw the enthusiasm for the hard work of social reform replaced by discussions about the quality of produce. That an apparent short supply of idealism existed among members provided a cause for deep concern. The IAOS's conference occurred on the eve

in Civilising rural Ireland
Juvenile actors and humanitarian sentiment in the 1940s
Michael Lawrence

Ruth’s ‘sentimental’ idealism (regulations should not prevent her from carrying out her responsibilities) and the inspectors’ objective ‘sense’ (responsibility for children requires regulations), but ultimately, and inevitably, endorses Ruth’s subterfuge. It is this subterfuge, after all, which provides the romantic plot with the conventional element of uncertainty regarding the heroine’s eventual marital happiness. While

in Global humanitarianism and media culture
The United States Peace Corps in the early 1960s
Agnieszka Sobocinska

the free world. Recruitment publicity emphasised volunteers’ altruism, whilst omitting details about the work they would do, or why it was needed. One of the earliest official Peace Corps publications, the Peace Corps Fact Book began with the question, ‘Why a Peace Corps?’ As an answer, the Fact Book reaffirmed Western motivations, writing that ‘the Peace Corps idea … has demonstrated a strong appeal to the idealism and

in Global humanitarianism and media culture