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Alexis Heraclides and Ada Dialla

society. 8 Charles Alexandrowicz has argued that the shrinking of international society’s scope to ‘Eurocentrism’ was due to the switch from natural law, which was universal, to positivism, with its emphasis on treaty law, sovereignty, international personality and recognition (as constitutive of statehood) confined to the so-called ‘civilized states’ as original members of the ‘family of nations’. 9 This is arguable, for many nineteenth century jurists

in Humanitarian intervention in the long nineteenth century
Open Access (free)
Association and distinction in politics and religion
Rodney Barker

of difference, between elite and mass will be a feature of the political system and, accordingly, as it differs between affinity and distance, so will the rest of the system between open, mobilised, democratic, and closed, authoritarian. But whatever the system, an identity is in the first place that of a person or group, and one which functions to tell them, rather than others, who they are. That narrative is confirmed in the recognition of others, but nonetheless it starts with a subject, not with an observer. Once there is more than one

in Cultivating political and public identity
Open Access (free)
Jeremy C.A. Smith

-​solving can be found in the opposite of this potential, which indeed is a great threat in the early twenty-​ first century: the retreat into nationalism, homelands and border closures, which are closures of the mind as well as closures of territory. The ‘mission’, if you will, of responding to the problems of the present therefore, as a second requisite, calls for recognition of complexity in collective modes of living and an appreciation for the extent of complexity in so-​called traditional societies. Too many instantiations of collective imaginaries throughout world

in Debating civilisations
Open Access (free)
Simona Giordano, John Harris, and Lucio Piccirillo

international policy groups. Scientific research on pathogens is afflicted inherently by a profound tension: scientific work on pathogens yields huge public health benefits, but the same public health protection calls for a restriction on such work, or at the very least tight control of the release of information. International and national policy, Rhodes points out, increasingly hold scientists responsible for public health protection; but, as she notes, there must be recognition of reciprocal responsibilities of scientists and policymakers, to develop effective

in The freedom of scientific research
Sol Plaatje and W.E.B.Du Bois
Laura Chrisman

might seem to bear out Masilela’s contention that black South African intellectuals were led to imitate African Americans. But the inspiration is quickly offset here by Plaatje’s despondent recognition of the incommensurability between the two countries. Without a similar material base, modern African-American chapter5 21/12/04 11:16 am Black Atlantic nationalism Page 95 95 activities cannot simply be transposed to South Africa, their achievements imitated within black South Africa. It is the need for a specifically national, and nationally specific, material

in Postcolonial contraventions
Open Access (free)
Janelle Joseph

collective emotional state (Davis, 1979 , p. 14). Today, nostalgia is no longer regarded negatively and is not only connected to pining for a geographical home. It is seen as a “bittersweet” emotion of wistful longing for the past and recalling or reliving “the way things were,” combined with the recognition that return is impossible. Emotions such as nostalgia are not merely

in Sport in the Black Atlantic
Open Access (free)
Janelle Joseph

recognition. ” That recognition may be sought from other black groups, dominant white groups, or the South Asian diasporas. Therefore, any study of contemporary Afro-Caribbean culture and politics must account for the historical ways in which Afro-Indo relations are loaded with the previous politics of slavery, indentured service and postcolonial nation-building projects in the Caribbean as well as

in Sport in the Black Atlantic
Hannah Jones, Yasmin Gunaratnam, Gargi Bhattacharyya, William Davies, Sukhwant Dhaliwal, Emma Jackson, and Roiyah Saltus

(now law), and how immigration rhetoric and legislation position immigrants as not contributing to society. As part of this emphasis on ‘making a contribution’, he appeals for recognition and empathy on the basis of independence from state welfare. For example, when describing an encounter with a woman who believed that refugees were given free phones, cars etc., Nader emphasised that they were not in the UK for the welfare system

in Go home?
Open Access (free)
‘Ordinary’ people and immigration politics
Hannah Jones, Yasmin Gunaratnam, Gargi Bhattacharyya, William Davies, Sukhwant Dhaliwal, Emma Jackson, and Roiyah Saltus

hostile environment for certain migrants in ways that we have explored throughout the book. Within this hostile environment there remains recognition that immigration touches all of our lives, as world populations are increasingly on the move, and where this movement is full of historical and geo-social layerings and legacies of transit and encounter. Politicians’ calls to ‘ordinary people’ who are affected by immigration control are often

in Go home?
Where and when does the violence end?
David M. Anderson and Paul J. Lane

with the human remains from its troubled past, whether potent or toxic, but we will frame our analysis with the re­cognition that Kenya’s problems with human remains of this kind are far from unique. We begin, therefore, with a wide-​ranging discussion of the politics of the dead in the context of museum collections generally, which we describe as a classic example of what is termed a ‘wicked problem’. We then move on to contextualise 16 16   Human remains in society the Kenya case, giving a detailed account of the human remains currently housed in the Osteology

in Human remains in society