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New generation Northern Irish poets (Sinéad Morrissey and Nick Laird)
Michael Parker

the younger poets, I would suggest that many traits identified by Brown and Guinness are equally demonstrable in the writing of their literary forebears, the Heaney–Mahon–Longley and Muldoon– McGuckian–Carson generations. Indeed, Brown himself recognises continuities in content, form and style, and how poets from each generation developed different strategies in facing up to a common imperative, the need to address the appalling evil that destroyed so much of, and in, the province from the late 1960s onwards: ‘Darkness remains both a felt, elemental or metaphysical

in Irish literature since 1990
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Peter Morey

of a growing body of ‘ethnic’ writers within ‘multicultural’ Canada; his writing as ‘diasporic discourse’, articulating a view of both Canada and India from the peripheries; the Indian subject matter he chooses and the influence of his Parsi background; the role of storytelling as both theme and technique; gender politics and the depiction of female characters; and, related to issues of reading and reception, the question of whether Mistry’s style should be viewed as realist or something else. The scale and complexity of this critical engagement has, of course

in Rohinton Mistry
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Where postcolonialism is neo-orientalist – the cases of Sarojini Naidu and Arundhati Roy
Elleke Boehmer

Naidu (1876–1949), the Indian woman poet or ‘little Indian princess’, later Gandhi’s right-hand woman.2 Born in Hyderabad into a prominent intellectual Bengali family, the Chattopadhyays or Chatterjees, Sarojini Naidu as a girl showed an extraordinary precocity in writing poetry, mainly in imitation of British Romantic writers: her ambition was to be ‘a Keats for India’.3 At 15 she was sent to England, to King’s College, London, and then Girton in Cambridge, both to continue her education, and – her parents’ explicit desire – to separate her from the man who was

in Stories of women
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Debatable lands and passable boundaries
Aileen Christianson

to be Debateable Lands betwixt the twa nations of Scotland and England’, and very specifically defined as ‘now forming the Parishes of Canonbie in Scotland and Kirk Andrews on Esk in England’ (Carlyle 1868: appendix 33, 1). It became first a term for the Scottish/English borders as a whole, which were fought over and consequently neither static nor entirely definable. Its subsequent manifestation is as a metaphor for any borderline state or idea.2 Women’s writing in particular is often assessed in terms of borders and margins that provide those tropes of liminality

in Across the margins
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John Robert Keller

Introduction For the listener, who listens in the snow, And, nothing himself, beholds, Nothing that is not there and the nothing that is. Wallace Stevens Till feeling the need for company again he tells himself to call the hearer M at least. (Samuel Beckett) It is often said that the opening words of the psychoanalytical session contain the totality of what is to come. Thinking this true of the scholarly text, I find myself writing that this study is primarily about love. This might seem somewhat odd for a reading of Beckett, but I hope that in what follows the

in Samuel Beckett and the primacy of love
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Marianne Moore
David Herd

4 Presenting: Marianne Moore There was no frenzy about Marianne Moore. She composed not in fits and bursts, but patiently, sometimes over several years. She steadfastly refused to envisage herself as inspired. Her writing doesn’t flirt with gibberish. Her principal mode of production was accumulation. In her various notebooks – of quotations and conversations – she amassed the materials that would sometimes, eventually, constitute the fabric of her poems. One readily available way to view her, therefore, is as a collector, an antiquarian, rooting among the

in Enthusiast!
Contemporary Irish and Scottish fiction
Glenda Norquay and Gerry Smyth

ways in which relations between cultural representation and spatial construction are negotiated in each case to produce places called ‘Scotland’ and ‘Ireland’. In the innovations of recent writing, challenging new maps of archipelagic spaces have emerged; yet in the reception of such writing in mainstream culture we can also discern the perpetuation of older patterns of assimilation. I In the preface to the 1829 edition of his novel Waverley (first published in 1814), Walter Scott cited amongst his influences the Anglo-Irish writer Maria Edgeworth, and particularly

in Across the margins
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Ben Okri, Chenjerai Hove, Dambudzo Marechera
Elleke Boehmer

, the emphases have heftily shifted in the oncegrand tale, as recorded in leaders’ autobiographies, of African national coming-into-being. Mid- to late 1980s narratives from a range of writers – Achebe, Farah, Ben Okri, Chenjerai Hove and Dambudzo Marechera, among others (including the early 1980s writing of Bessie Head) – attest that it is the nation’s story as story, and as nightmare, that forms the focus of attention. Writers are now preoccupied with the at-once-liberating-yet-appalling possibility of there being no there there. The fact that women have long been

in Stories of women
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Elleke Boehmer

pertains whether we look at the arena of postcolonial national politics – at national pageantry, presidential cavalcades, garlanded grandstands – or, as in this book Stories of Women, within the somewhat more secluded spaces of national literatures and the writing of the nation. Gender, the nation and postcolonial narrative As in the cross-section of a tree trunk that is nowhere unmarked by its grain – by that pattern expressing its history – so, too, is the nation informed throughout by its gendered history, by the normative masculinities and femininities that have

in Stories of women
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Postcolonial women writers in a transnational frame
Elleke Boehmer

organisation which has historically, however, often sidelined women’s issues.) In what ways have feminist critics of women’s writing found in the cross-national and diasporic a hospitable axis on which to place their reading of this work? To attempt this question should give a perspective on the hegemony of the transnational in postcolonial criticism; those ways in which the postcolonial novel today, defined as diasporic and multilingual, yet often Eurocentric in reference, is seen in contradistinction to the 1960s novel of decolonisation based in the nation. By way of

in Stories of women