Kurds of northern Iraq (1991), Somalia (1992), Bosnia (1992–95), the intervention of the Economic Community Of West African States (ECOWAS) in Liberia (1990–96), the US-led intervention in Haiti (1994), French-led forces in Rwanda (1994), NATO’s intervention in Serbia and Kosovo (1999) and the Australian-led intervention in East Timor (1999). In Rwanda effective French intervention came very late, following three months of genocidal massacre by the Hutus of

in Humanitarian intervention in the long nineteenth century
Open Access (free)

was still offered by religious orders, and most nurses received no formal training.87 The French Flag Nursing Corps appears to have been a success, although much of what we 14 Introduction know of it is reported through the pages of that somewhat partial organ of nursing professionalization, the BJN. The Corps was brought under the auspices of the British Committee of the French Red Cross in March 1917.88 The development of the nursing professions in self-governing British dominions such as Australia, New Zealand, and Canada had been heavily influenced by that of

in Nurse Writers of the Great War

31 Negotiating nursing her ward is no more detailed, ‘we feed, tuck them up for the night, not half of them get washed, some are very ill’.49 Sister Jessie Wilson is equally brief in her narrative of the care given to Greek soldiers as they arrived from fighting in Albania. Moreover, she has a chaperone: ‘Mac, the Australian orderly and I got them into bed, bathed and fed them.’50 Yet this momentary description of bodily care is stark against the graphic description of one particular patient’s head wound. Arguably, it is the nature of body care and not the

in Negotiating nursing
Mainstreaming gender, democratizing the state?

for women ‘transform gender equality activists into technocrats/bureaucrats first and foremost, or is it that they have tended to attract technocratic feminists?’ (Tsikata, 1999:17), in other contexts, such as Australia and Canada, feminists insisted that they needed to engage with the state bureaucracy to influence policy making within 22 CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORKS state bodies in the interests of women outside. As Marian Sawer explains in chapter 12 of this volume, an ‘important aspect of the Australian model of women’s policy machinery was that it was originally

in Mainstreaming gender, democratizing the state?
Open Access (free)
Conceptual links to institutional machineries

Australia, Canada and New Zealand, ‘bilingualism’ is required in both the dominant and gender discourses, coupled with connections to outside constituencies, which themselves understand the institutional structures, pressure points in budget cycles and procedural issues (Sawer, 1996:23). Typically, small groups of officials deal with budget policy. Those in dialogue need to be a broader group than the few who generally meet ‘behind closed doors’. This group would include spending ministries, women’s and other groups in the general public, and researchers and policy

in Mainstreaming gender, democratizing the state?

15 January 1900, where the mayor read Clark Murray’s telegram: ‘Will the women of Fredericton unite with the women of Montreal in federating as “Daughters of the Empire” and inviting the women of Australia and New Zealand to unite with them in sending to the Queen an expression of our devotion to the Empire and an emergency war fund to be expended as Her Majesty shall deem fit?’ 11 As well as

in Female imperialism and national identity
Open Access (free)

appreciative of the services of colonial auxiliaries, not only locally raised bodies such as the Imperial Light Horse and Major M. F. Rimington’s Guides, but contingents from Canada, Australia and New Zealand. Apart from reservations about the discipline of some colonial units, officers frequently lauded their skills. As Corporal Jewell (New Zealand Mounted Rifles) informed his sister in Cheltenham: ‘General

in The Victorian soldier in Africa
Open Access (free)

Muslims, which in instances of liberation wars were committed first by the Christian insurgents, who had opted for the use of violence, with the Ottomans over-reacting (in the Greek and Bulgarian cases) and then facing the wrath of ‘civilized’ Europe. Military intervention was never contemplated for the excesses and barbarities of the British in Jamaica, South Africa and elsewhere in Africa, the French and Belgians in Africa, quasi-genocide in British Australia or US policy

in Humanitarian intervention in the long nineteenth century
Open Access (free)
Portraying the exhumation and reburial of Polish Jewish Holocaust victims in the pages of yizkor books

-roots efforts by surviving members of hundreds of destroyed Jewish communities. Meant to commemorate these communities, yizkor books were published in small runs, primarily in the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s, by landsmanshaftn, mutual-aid societies of Jews located mainly in Israel and North America but also in South America, Australia, and various countries in Western Europe who 36   Gabriel N. Finder came from the same town or region in Eastern Europe. Six hundred yizkor books have been published. Ninety per cent pertain to Jewish communities within the borders of interwar

in Human remains and identification
Challenges and technological solutions to the ­identification of individuals in mass grave scenarios in the modern context

, 57 (2012), 47–51. Gonzalez-Rodriguez & Fowler, ‘A study on the discrimination’. Ibid. S. Dillane, M. Thompson, J. Meyer, M. Norquay & R.  C. O’Brien, ‘Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) as a method of species differentiation of bone fragments’, Australian Journal of Forensic Sciences, 43 (2011), 297–312. Dillane et  al., ‘Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy’. J. E. Byrd & B. J. Adams, ‘Osteometric sorting of commingled human remains’, Journal of Forensic Sciences, 48 (2003), 717–24. For example, E. Anastasiou & A

in Human remains and identification