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Open Access (free)
Christine E. Hallett

hospitals to serve overseas, were deeply frustrated at the knowledge that semi-trained volunteers were working in base hospitals close to the Western Front, while they themselves were effectively trapped in civilian practice.3 Realising war’s realities Some works, such as Kate Finzi’s Eighteen Months in the War Zone and Lesley Smith’s Four Years out of Life, illustrate the extent to which, even whilst being influenced by war propaganda, volunteers 188 The British ‘VAD’ could feel compelled to give faithful accounts of their experiences that actually undermined that

in Nurse Writers of the Great War
Open Access (free)
Jonathan Atkin

popular imagination. It involved more spheres of human experience than perhaps any previous conflict. Whole populations were caught up in it and exhibited myriad shades of reaction to it – including, naturally, opposition. This book concentrates on those individualistic British citizens whose motivation for opposition in thought or deed was grounded upon moral, humanistic or aesthetic precepts. There have been previous studies based around specific British religious or political conscientious objection to the war but none concentrating on any existing moral, humanistic

in A war of individuals
Open Access (free)
The wall texts of a Percy family manuscript and the Poulys Daunce of St Paul’s Cathedral
Heather Blatt

late-medieval England order to provide more accessible experiences to wider audiences. Rewards might even be considered greater for those who travelled mentally as opposed to physically, for the mental travellers received their rewards for this spiritual labour from God alone.67 Yet the continued popularity of pilgrimage in the later Middle Ages challenges the valuation thus placed upon mental pilgrimage. As Kathryne Beebe observes, ‘Pilgrimage in spirit perhaps drew basic inspiration from a fundamental ambivalence within Christian thought about the merits of going

in Participatory reading in late-medieval England
Open Access (free)
Language, lies and the crisis of representation in Such a Long Journey
Peter Morey

over broken glass In our dry cellar (T. S. Eliot, The Hollow Men, lines 1–10) COMMENTING on the possibilities for narrating the colourful story of India’s historical experiences, Rukmini Nair writes: It sometimes seems apt to imagine the history of this subcontinent as a palimpsest of literary forms. First a substantial layer of myth and epic, then a burning layer of tragedy, then farce and so forth. Lately, the furious discovery of political scandals we’ve witnessed might suggest that it is now an action thriller, Hindi-film style, which is currently being written

in Rohinton Mistry
Open Access (free)
Reading practices and participation in digital and medieval media
Heather Blatt

Erceldoune’s prophecy provokes readers to reorganize chronologies, with the effect that readers craft individual narratives of past and future. Hull and Norton focus on modes of temporal manipulation, engaging readers in choices that affect their temporalized experiences of reading. These texts encourage readers to shape their understanding of personal history, political history, and the future of the political or spiritual self through temporally mediated reading. In this way, specific perceptual views of time emerge from individual acts of reading. Reading becomes an

in Participatory reading in late-medieval England
Sara Haslam

7 ‘These fragments I have shored against my ruins’ 1 ‘Eliot was different from either Pound or Yeats in being a poet who brought into consciousness, and into confrontation with one another, two opposite things: the spiritually negative character of the contemporary world, and the spiritually positive character of the past tradition.’2 Other analysts of modernism would qualify Stephen Spender’s comparison here, but the oppositions he identifies are, of course, fundamental to an atavistic modernism (as is Eliot’s language of fragments to modernism generally3). In

in Fragmenting modernism
Open Access (free)
Nursing work and nurses’ space in the Second World War: a gendered construction
Jane Brooks

a wounded soldier climbing the gangplank onto the transport ship the Arundel Castle. Underneath the image she writes, ‘Recovery was hard’.8 Negotiating nursing argues that the QAs, an entirely female force during the Second World War, were critical players in the care of combatants. By renegotiating what counted as nursing work and how nursing work could be performed, nursing sisters were able to support men’s physical, emotional and spiritual recovery from illness and injury for the war effort. The Army Medical Service was not well prepared for war: there was a

in Negotiating nursing
Open Access (free)
Thomas of Erceldoune’s prophecy, Eleanor Hull’s Commentary on the penitential Psalms, and Thomas Norton’s Ordinal of alchemy
Heather Blatt

own awareness of time presses upon him, for he has reached his mid-fifties and thinks often about how the sweetness of the world too easily turns to bitterness. In this passage Hoccleve illustrates several common notions of time 168 Participatory reading in late-medieval England that developed over the course of the Middle Ages. He describes the effects of experiencing time that he conceives of as possessing an inevitable, linear force; he also addresses the circularity of time, which can predictably turn from sweetness to bitterness, and back again to sweetness

in Participatory reading in late-medieval England
Open Access (free)
West Indian intellectual
Helen Carr

contrary view: ‘White creoles in the English and French West Indies have separated themselves by too wide a gulf, and have contributed too little culturally, as a group, to give credence to the notion that they can, given the present structure, meaningfully identify or be identified with the spiritual world on this side of the Sargasso Sea’. 10 Revisiting these comments twenty years later, Brathwaite

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Open Access (free)
The complexities of collaborative authorship
Paul Henley

Bali that participatory and reflexive authorial strategies are most developed. All but one of these five films concern Jero Tapakan, a traditional healer who seeks to help her clients through contacting the spirit world to establish whether their illnesses and misfortunes have a spiritual origin or are due to a failure to make appropriate ritual offerings. But she also diagnoses and treats more physical illnesses through massage therapy, and prescribes certain herbal remedies that she herself prepares. In the first of the films about Jero

in Beyond observation