Search results

Open Access (free)
Language, lies and the crisis of representation in Such a Long Journey

over broken glass In our dry cellar (T. S. Eliot, The Hollow Men, lines 1–10) COMMENTING on the possibilities for narrating the colourful story of India’s historical experiences, Rukmini Nair writes: It sometimes seems apt to imagine the history of this subcontinent as a palimpsest of literary forms. First a substantial layer of myth and epic, then a burning layer of tragedy, then farce and so forth. Lately, the furious discovery of political scandals we’ve witnessed might suggest that it is now an action thriller, Hindi-film style, which is currently being written

in Rohinton Mistry
Open Access (free)
Reading practices and participation in digital and medieval media

Erceldoune’s prophecy provokes readers to reorganize chronologies, with the effect that readers craft individual narratives of past and future. Hull and Norton focus on modes of temporal manipulation, engaging readers in choices that affect their temporalized experiences of reading. These texts encourage readers to shape their understanding of personal history, political history, and the future of the political or spiritual self through temporally mediated reading. In this way, specific perceptual views of time emerge from individual acts of reading. Reading becomes an

in Participatory reading in late-medieval England

and form’.28 Judging the text by the success of the first passage quoted, it achieves its aims: memory and desire create vision, the momentary experience of the past in the present. Ford has created in his vision of the novel, one shared to a greater or lesser degree with other modernists, an eminently plastic and various form.29 He is unique in the way that he binds this to its spiritual, sociological and emotional regenerative promise. Ford’s often prevalent aim, when writing, is to capture the essence of Greek drama, as perceived by him.30 The effect of his

in Fragmenting modernism
Open Access (free)
Nursing work and nurses’ space in the Second World War: a gendered construction

a wounded soldier climbing the gangplank onto the transport ship the Arundel Castle. Underneath the image she writes, ‘Recovery was hard’.8 Negotiating nursing argues that the QAs, an entirely female force during the Second World War, were critical players in the care of combatants. By renegotiating what counted as nursing work and how nursing work could be performed, nursing sisters were able to support men’s physical, emotional and spiritual recovery from illness and injury for the war effort. The Army Medical Service was not well prepared for war: there was a

in Negotiating nursing
Open Access (free)
Thomas of Erceldoune’s prophecy, Eleanor Hull’s Commentary on the penitential Psalms, and Thomas Norton’s Ordinal of alchemy

own awareness of time presses upon him, for he has reached his mid-fifties and thinks often about how the sweetness of the world too easily turns to bitterness. In this passage Hoccleve illustrates several common notions of time 168 Participatory reading in late-medieval England that developed over the course of the Middle Ages. He describes the effects of experiencing time that he conceives of as possessing an inevitable, linear force; he also addresses the circularity of time, which can predictably turn from sweetness to bitterness, and back again to sweetness

in Participatory reading in late-medieval England
Harold Moody and the League of Coloured Peoples

proclaim to predominantly white congregations the Christian message of a colour-blind society, which he believed essential if the British empire were to survive. By the late 1920s Moody realised that the ingrained racial prejudice that he continued to experience in Britain needed to be opposed by more systematic action and better directed pressure. In 1931, with the support of Quakers, he founded the League of Coloured Peoples

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain

with Gregory XIII, who, after he had personally studied the decrees, approved them in their entirety.9 Borromeo’s personal reputation as a famously zealous reformer and his membership of a well-connected Roman ecclesiastical family surely contributed to this resounding victory for his archiepiscopal initiative and authority. The affair bears some comparison with the experience of François de Sourdis, who decided to emulate Borromeo by convening his own provincial council in Bordeaux forty-six years later. The contrasts between the two incidents, however, are just as

in Fathers, pastors and kings
Open Access (free)

philanthropy mounted, 62 and as the demographic crisis eased, so attention turned to spiritual improvement. Evangelicals, preoccupied as they were by conversion and atonement, were eminently qualified to take up the cause. This shift from humanitarian to missionary philanthropy affected attitudes to the poor, but simultaneously directed attention to peoples colonized by the (re)orientation of Britain’s imperial endeavours

in The other empire
Open Access (free)
West Indian intellectual

contrary view: ‘White creoles in the English and French West Indies have separated themselves by too wide a gulf, and have contributed too little culturally, as a group, to give credence to the notion that they can, given the present structure, meaningfully identify or be identified with the spiritual world on this side of the Sargasso Sea’. 10 Revisiting these comments twenty years later, Brathwaite

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Open Access (free)
Mirrors of French ideals?

chap 6 22/3/04 12:54 pm Page 171 6 Manuals and hagiography: mirrors of French ideals? Didactic literature for bishops was hardly a new phenomenon in the seventeenth century; indeed its pedigree extends all the way back to the early church. Nor was it an exclusively French tradition. During the late sixteenth century numerous efforts were made outside France to produce texts which would be sources of both spiritual nourishment and practical administrative guidance for prelates.1 Within France itself, however, no work of this kind was produced during that

in Fathers, pastors and kings