Open Access (free)
The Australian and New Zealand repertoires and fortunes of North American performers Margaret Anglin, Katherine Grey and Muriel Starr

leading ladies.6 Hence, the advent of talkies also compromised this unique and valued advantage of the stage ‘emotional actress’. The category of ‘naturalness’ in performance remains ever relative and slippery. The ‘natural’ performance is to an extent place-bound but more essentially time-bound, as a culture’s social modes of self-­ presentation evolve and mutate alongside its theatrical codes of mimetic representation, locked in a reciprocal dance whose conventionality is largely obscured from contemporaries, though more evident to the view of subsequent or foreign

in Stage women, 1900–50
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Lillian Leitzel’s celebrity, agency and her performed femininity

finale the musical accompaniment changed to emphasise the spectacular nature of each turn. Towards the beginning of her career her planche turns were accompanied by Rimsky-Korsakov’s The Flight of the Bumblebee, which added a sense of frenetic tension to the performance. From around 1925 this changed to a special arrangement by Ringling Bros and Barnum & Bailey bandmaster Merle Evans to the staccato ‘The Dance of the Hours’ from La Gioconda by Amilcare Ponchinelli (Bradna and Spence, 1953: 150). Heightening anticipation further, each revolution is accompanied by a

in Stage women, 1900–50
Open Access (free)
Working memory

Doreen Massey, every site, regardless of scale, is networked to other localities and is itself multiple.18 Contemporary French street theatre is as diverse in aesthetic form as in its choice of location. A visitor to the International Festival of Street Theatre in Aurillac will encounter magicians, mimes, jugglers, and fire spinners; processions and parades; dance, circus, and installation art; and technologically sophisticated spectacles involving multimedia projection and elaborate, moving set pieces. Examples of street theatre discussed in this book include object

in Street theatre and the production of postindustrial space
Open Access (free)
Amateur film, civic culture and the rehearsal of monarchy

a royal visit and there is no anxiety or apparent confusion manifested either by the Queen or by the spectators as to how they should behave. However, filmed in a way that exposes the clumsiness and artificiality of the formal choreography, it also appears rather ridiculous, a fragile dance of politesse sustained almost entirely by convention and the performance of the Queen herself – something that becomes much more

in The British monarchy on screen
Open Access (free)
The King’s Speech as melodrama

room by Logue, or sings and dances his speech or punctuates it with profanities, as do the Windsors’ clumsy negotiation with the lift cage in the building where Lionel has his consulting room. This gentle debunking of the royals’ sense of superiority makes them more accessible, portraying them as private individuals with normal longings and weaknesses – a project similar to the monarchy films Mrs

in The British monarchy on screen
Gender and contemporary fantasies of witchcraft

interrogators then demanded whether her mother had taught her anything? Magdalena hesitated again, but then said that her mother (who had died three months earlier) had told her that she must murder her children and that she had also killed the twins she had had in 1627 by crushing their temples. Her mother had also taken her to witches’ dances on a fire-iron but infrequently, as Magdalena had been unenthusiastic about attending. She was again asked about the death of her baby by her first husband but insisted that it had died of convulsions. When asked how she could have

in Witchcraft narratives in Germany
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Sibylle Lacan’s Un père: puzzle

-je tombée? Un père n’était-il pas un père? (pp. –) (My first real encounter with Judith crushed me. She was so nice, so perfect, and I was so awkward, so gauche. She was all sociability, at ease, I was the peasant woman from the Danube. She looked like a woman, I still had a childish air. That feeling lasted for a long time. Since then, I have come across this feminine specimen and I know how to deal with it. But at the time I was overwhelmed, guilty [. . .] A haunting memory is the vision of my father and Judith dancing like lovers at a local dance in Ramatuelle. What

in Women’s writing in contemporary France
The Spanish Gardener and its analogues

falconry and the primal experience of gardening feel like lessons in growth in that they contribute to a changing character, but in Billy Elliot ballet functions simply as entertainment for a toe-tapping audience. It feels replaceable, it is an obviously ‘feminine’ alternative to that masculine sport of boxing (Billy’s mother and grandmother are both associated with dancing and Billy uses his father

in British cinema of the 1950s
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Putting the countryside back to work

referred to attempts to blur the distinction between cultural producers and consumers, though ‘animation’ implied spontaneity and active group learning and ‘création’ implied longer processes.25 Whereas Malraux had attempted to democratize cultural consumption, so that all could consume the same high-quality cultural products, Lang attempted to democratize cultural production, so that popular and emergent forms could receive funding alongside museums and opera houses. The French government began to subsidize cartoon and comic exhibits, hip-hop music and dance festivals

in Street theatre and the production of postindustrial space

ideas fornication → body apparently stuck in Shakespeare’s mind: in 1.3 Toby urges Andrew to ‘Accost [Maria] ... front her, boord her’ (54–5); when she rebuffs him, the pair fall to talking about the quality of their bodies: hair, legs, throats, and dancing skills (92–100, 110–37). Paul protests the Corinthians’ bouts of raillery and drunkenness much

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind