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Staging visual clues and early modern aspiration
Jackie Watson

further discussion of the sensory engagement antitheatricalists associated with theatregoing see Hannah August’s Chapter 11, in this volume. 11 A second and third blast of retrait from plaies and Theaters (1580), p. 64. All further references are cited in the text. 12 For further examination of the role of the mind, as well as the eyes, in visual deception see Stuart Clark’s Vanities of the Eye: Vision in Early Modern European Culture (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007): ‘visual experiences were constructed out of mental expectations as well as data transmitted by

in The senses in early modern England, 1558–1660
John Donne, George Chapman and the senses of night in the 1590s
Susan Wiseman

, albeit in enigmatic ways. MUP_Smith_Printer.indd 144 02/04/2015 16:18 Donne, Chapman and the senses of night 145 Notes   1 For images of the Doom see www.wenhaston.net/doom/ [accessed 1 July 2013].  2 John Milton, Paradise Lost www.dartmouth.edu/~milton/reading_room/pl/ book_2/ [accessed 23 July 2014]; Paradise Lost, ed. by Alastair Fowler (London: Longman, 1968), p. 118.   3 Craig Koslofsky, Evening’s Empire: A History of the Night in Early Modern Europe (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011), pp. 1–2; on ‘segmented’ sleep, see p. 6.   4 R.C. Bald

in The senses in early modern England, 1558–1660
Antony and Cleopatra and visual musical experience
Simon Smith

order to stop him seeing Beaumelle, Charalois still recognizes his wife aurally. Charalois’s demand for visual stimulation typifies early modern expectations of complete musical experience, doing so in explicit and unequivocal terms. Similar responses to hidden musical performance appear in textual accounts of court entertainment that circulated in print in early modern Europe. In Olivier de la Marche’s late fifteenth-century French work, Memoirs of the House of Burgundy, a text that enjoyed multiple printings in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, the author

in The senses in early modern England, 1558–1660
Open Access (free)
Balance, malleability and anthropology: historical contexts
Chris Millard

anthropological theory developed in the study of twentieth-century rural Africa, used by Keith Thomas to explore early modern European witchcraft. 29 This does not, of course, make Keith Thomas a ‘postmodernist’. However, it highlights the exchange between social history and anthropology more generally. It shows how practices that are seen as part of ‘postmodernism’ in the 1990s are influenced by practices lifted from anthropology in the 1980s. Bernard Cohn sees deep connections between

in Balancing the self
Katherine Aron-Beller

, monitored and punished. Ironically, then, the result of the Inquisition’s actions may well have been even greater contact between the two communities with heightened mutual curiosity, fascination and interest. Notes 1 See Jan Fiar Bestor, ‘Bastardy and Legitimacy in the Formation of a Regional State in Italy: The Estense Succession’, Comparative Studies in Society and History, 38/3 (July 1996), pp. 549–85. On the position of the Pope in early modern Europe see the excellent work of Paolo Prodi in The Papal Prince: One Body and Two Souls

in Jews on trial
Eric Pudney

Society, 1926), l. pp. 953–59. Subsequent references, given parenthetically, are to this edition. 75 Whether or not the witch of Endor had any real power was a disputed point in early modern Europe, as was the nature of the apparition that spoke to Saul; see Stuart Clark, Vanities of the Eye (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007), pp. 242–44, and the section on Macbeth in Chapter 3. Witchcraft in Elizabethan drama 83 (presumably the same prop was used in Greene’s Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay), and delivers false prophecies which lead directly to the death of the

in Scepticism and belief in English witchcraft drama, 1538–1681
Open Access (free)
Geoffrey Chaucer’s Troilus and Criseyde and John Lydgate’s Troy Book
Heather Blatt

suggests, as will be discussed below in its medieval application, crowd-sourced, open-access approaches did not produce a sustainable practice for writers or readers. 32 Spiro Kiousis, ‘Interactivity: a concept explication’, in New media and society 4.3 (2002), 355–83, at 356. 33 Elizabeth Eisenstein, The Printing press as an agent of change: communications and cultural transformations in early-modern Europe. 2 vols. (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1979). 34 For a magisterial response to Eisenstein’s argument, along with a detailed counter depicting

in Participatory reading in late-medieval England
Eric Pudney

one Quarrel of Glass broken. Her master swore, that she being in the middle of the Room, she suddenly screamed out, saying, Something is got into my back, when going to her, he pulled out a great piece of Clay from about the middle of her back, stuck as full of pins as ever it could hold.74 71 Brian P. Levack, ‘The Decline and End of Witchcraft Prosecutions’, in The Oxford Handbook of Witchcraft in Early Modern Europe and Colonial America, edited by Brian P. Levack (Oxford, Oxford University Press: 2013), pp. 429–46 (pp. 438–39). 72 This pattern is described by

in Scepticism and belief in English witchcraft drama, 1538–1681
Eric Pudney

first section of this chapter discusses the nature of body and spirit as understood in early modern thought and the importance of these concepts within the Restoration witchcraft debate. The following section turns to witchcraft as it was represented in the theatre, highlighting both growing scepticism towards witchcraft and growing interest in the operations of spirit in the material world. The nature of spirit and body A great deal was written in medieval and early modern Europe about the nature of spirits and their relationship to the human body and the physical

in Scepticism and belief in English witchcraft drama, 1538–1681
Open Access (free)
Bronwen Price

Atlantis and the laboratory of prose’, in Elizabeth Fowler and Roland Greene (eds), The Project of Prose in Early Modern Europe and the New World (Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1997), p. 143). 10 See ibid., pp. 147–8 and also Chapter 8 of this volume. 11 Box points out the ‘ahistoric quality’ of Bensalemite society, which appears to exist ‘in a seemingly timeless present’ without appearing to be ‘oriented to the future’ (The Social Thought, p. 128). Box links this temporal quality to the relative inactivity of Bensalem’s citizens, who seem to want for nothing

in Francis Bacon’s New Atlantis