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‘Gothicism’, ‘historicism’, and the overlap of fictional modes from Thomas Leland to Walter Scott
Christina Morin

's concern with the past as providing essential lessons for the present, particularly in terms of governmental rule and the security of individual rights and liberties. With its central interest in British history's relevance to contemporary society, Longsword has readily lent itself to analysis as an early example of the historical novel more commonly associated with Sir Walter Scott. 5 The gothic elements of the text indicated by Summers’ terminology have less frequently garnered attention. Rolf and Magda Loeber describe Longsword as a pre

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
Britishness, respectability, and imperial citizenship
Charles V. Reed

absence of comparable rationality and respectability. 19 They argued for what Theodore Koditschek defines as a Macaulian constitutionalism, ‘representative government, individual rights, the right to bear arms, “no taxation without representation,” [and] institutional checks and balances’. 20 As a related set of global political discourses, Victorian liberalism broadly embraced a universalism that

in Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911
Attitudes towards subversive movements and violent organisations
Ami Pedahzur

individual rights. An attempt to make sense of this tangled web of regulations will have to distinguish between three types of emergency legislation: 1 Defence (Emergency) Regulations, 1945: inherited from its predecessor, the British Mandatory Authorities in Palestine, these regulations grant a great deal of power to the military command. High-ranking officers are authorised to order house demolitions, impose curfews, make arrests, carry out searches and detain suspects without judicial restraint. The enforcement of these

in The Israeli response to Jewish extremism and violence
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A conceptualisation of violence against women’s health (VAWH)
Sara De Vido

recent judgment in López Soto, the case law of human rights courts has had a ‘knock-on effect’, upholding individual rights in several articles of the conventions of which they are the guardians, and could pave the way for amendments to those conventions or the addition of new protocols to them.87 This does not mean ‘inventing’ new rights or placing excessive burden on human rights courts, but rather implies conceiving a material right that already exists in other legal instruments, and has been the object of interpretation by courts. The future could bring some light

in Violence against women’s health in international law
Father– daughter incest and the economics of exchange
Jenny DiPlacidi

. 95 Walpole’s Matilda is barely able to overcome filial ties to save a man’s life while Adeline dissolves them when her sexual freedom is threatened. The contractual nature of her obligation to her father is voided by his refusal to grant her rights – see the analysis in Chapter 4 of obligation and individual rights in relation to incestuous relationships

in Gothic incest
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Thefts, violence and sexual threats
Jenny DiPlacidi

. 19 Wolfram Schmidgen, Eighteenth-Century Fiction and the Law of Property (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002), p. 166. 20 A more detailed analysis of eighteenth-century understandings of natural law and their application to Gothic representations of obligation, incest and individual

in Gothic incest
Bonnie Evans

treatment, but in its description it drew, again, almost wholesale from Wing. This distinction is important as it shows that Wing’s definition of autism entered several different arenas. Within the global expansion taking place in relation to disability rights, Wing’s autism was used to argue that individual rights and social, welfare and education services should be aimed

in The metamorphosis of autism
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Reconceptualising states’ obligations in countering VAWH
Sara De Vido

, under which several obligations can be included, from obligations towards an individual who has suffered a specific violation to more general obligations. The distinction between negative and positive obligations seems adamant: the former are conceived as obligations to abstain from interfering in the sphere of rights and individual freedoms, the latter require the state to perform certain actions, to intervene, and they are meant to promote the ‘realisation of individual rights and freedoms.’35 The two types of obligation are not so neat as this; they may overlap

in Violence against women’s health in international law
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‘Case history’ on violence against women, and against women’s rights to health and to reproductive health
Sara De Vido

Lagomaggiore, decided by the Third Chamber of Mendoza, Argentina, the right to health was considered in terms of the ­practitioner’s duty to ensure women’s health during childbirth. The judges concluded that the obstetrician had been negligent. The core of the judgment was the behaviour of the practitioner, rather than G.’s individual rights. Turning to the Italian case of malpractice during childbirth, with health consequences for the woman, the Cassazione, to which the couple appealed, acknowledged that separate cases had to be considered for the couple, because the impact

in Violence against women’s health in international law