Gumboot dance in South Africa
Dana Mills

history of writing the play in the preface to his anthology; after conceiving the idea of the play in 1978, and doing a few performances with the Bahumutsi Drama Group at the Moravian Church Hall in Diepkloof, Maponya writes: I was struck by a sudden sense of insecurity. The play astounded audiences who had not seen such heavily political work before and their response prompted me to send a script for legal advice. I sent it to the lawyer via Bishop Desmond Tutu, then Secretary General of the SACC. In his reply to Bishop Tutu, attorney Raymond Tucker advised as follows

in Dance and politics
Susan M. Johns

Clerkenwell.9 Muriel de Munteni also used her influence to secure additional gifts to Clerkenwell during her second marriage. In a charter of 1176–79 she and Maurice de Totham (d. before 1196) conjointly granted various rights in the land they held of the bishop of London, a charter which was witnessed by Robert and Michael de Munteni and Roger, son of Maurice.10 Muriel also witnessed a grant made by Maurice in 1181–86, as did her daughter Lecia, as well as Roger and John, the sons of Maurice, and Michael de Munteni.11 Maurice also made three other donations to Clerkenwell

in Noblewomen, aristocracy and power in the twelfth-century Anglo-Norman realm
Open Access (free)
Cautionary tales and oral tradition in early modern England
Alexandra Walsham

our belief cannot choose but at the length become doubtful and uncertain, like a tale that passeth from man to man, and is told as many ways as there are men to tell it’. The primitive Christians, he added, ‘never inquired what had been whispered in men’s ears; that which they believed and taught, they read it out of the book’. Richard Hooker likewise observed in his Lawes of Ecclesiastical Politie (1595): ‘What hazard the truth is in when it passes through the hands of report . . . how maimed and deformed it becomes’. Writing thirty years later Bishop Joseph Hall

in The spoken word
Open Access (free)
A tale of a young Jewess’s flirtation with Christianity
Katherine Aron-Beller

sought out Christians to help them. In 1601, Stephano de Malvertio delated that he had been approached by Israel, the 15–year-old son of Davide Sacerdote, while visiting the latter’s tailoring shop in Vignola.11 Realising that the boy was considering baptism, he took him to the Archpriest of the Cathedral, who suggested that he go straight away to the Bishop. According to the testimony of de Malvertio, Bishop Gaspare Silingardi did not have a place to keep the boy during the day and requested that de Malvertio take him home. During this interval in de Malvertio’s home

in Jews on trial
Open Access (free)
A locus for fantasy
Katherine Aron-Beller

said figure.’   Then the most illustrious bishop went immediately to the synagogue, and found those wicked Jews had attached that figure to the rope, and tormented it, inflicting insults and scorn upon it. Finding that the allegation was true, the most illustrious bishop told the Duke. He immediately closed the gates of the city, and took seven of the Jews, who were found to be the instigators of such a crime in contempt of the servants of God, and he had them hanged on Tuesday, 13th of the present month. The names of the Jews were: Giacobe Sacerdote, Salamone de

in Jews on trial
Open Access (free)
Katherine Aron-Beller

bishop, while the rich archive of Holy Office proceedings and correspondence was passed to the Duke as a temporary provision, which in the end became permanent. Although measuring the efficacy of the Papal Inquisition throughout the Italian peninsula for different types of offences is still in progress, it has been suggested that specialized and micro-historical studies of proceedings help to clarify how effective the Inquisition was, not only in setting moral and religious regulations, but also in monitoring those who allegedly transgressed these regulations. It also

in Jews on trial
S.J. Barnett

deist movement had been woven, its demise had, eventually, to be charted. 29 The Enlightenment and religion Bishop Butler’s Analogy of Religion (1736) is more or less unanimously credited with finally defeating deism, that relentlessly dangerous foe of the Anglican Church. But, as we now know, Butler’s sharp and learned logic of course only disembowelled a very modern fiction. Or did it? For there is no doubt that the Church and Bishop Butler were indeed understood by some contemporaries to be battling a mighty deist movement. Some modern commentators have even

in The Enlightenment and religion
Open Access (free)
Association and distinction in politics and religion
Rodney Barker

the spiritual governing elites. Humanity as a whole might be distinguished by its plumage, but bishops, judges, generals, and monarchs appeared to engage with special intensity in the embellishment, in all possible ways, of the human person. An ordinary soldier might earn and wear a few medals, but a general will wear dozens, and a president scores. The political and social elevation of an elite is enmeshed with the elevated intensity with which its identity at the head of a hierarchy is cultivated. The general wears a uniform to show he is a soldier, but the

in Cultivating political and public identity
Steve Sohmer

of satirical books ordered by Bishops Whitgift and Bancroft. 11 Among other items, the flames consumed works by Nashe and Gabriel Harvey, and Marlowe’s translations from Ovid’s Amores. The date ad quem is fixed by an entry in the Stationers’ Register on 4 August 1600 which describes As You Like It as ‘to be stayed’, that is, the

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind
Steve Sohmer

of Lords in 1751. But England’s canny Queen who had battled her bishops for calendar reform understood it. In sum, what Shakespeare has done in framing Twelfth Night, or What You Will is to knit together secular and sacred sources ( Gl’ingannati , Riche, Nashe, St Paul), friends and enemies (Nashe, Harvey), minor saints (Fabian, Sebastian, Leonard), bitter loss (Hamnet

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind