Martin MacGregor

testifyed’. That of Fearchar Macintosh, supposedly to be identified with the chief who was incarcerated in the castles of Edinburgh and Dunbar from 1495 to 1513, covered events down to c. 1496. That of ‘a parson of Croy, called sir Andrew MacPhail’, came down to c. 1550, and that of ‘George Monro of Davachgartie [Davochcartie], who sometime dwelt in Connadge [Connage]’, dealt more narrowly with four chiefships spanning c. 1496–c. 1550. Lachlann Macintosh goes out of his way to demonstrate that these works ‘ought not to be look’d upon as fabulous and untrue’, citing

in The spoken word
Open Access (free)
Refugees
Nicholas Atkin

-lived. With places in reception centres becoming scarce, and with the declaration of the Franco-German Armistice and the creation of the Vichy regime, from July 1940 new arrivals – whether refugees, volunteers for de Gaulle or even British citizens fleeing the Continent – were likely to discover themselves incarcerated in prisons until their bona fides could be vouched for. Such was the case of the writer Arthur Koestler who arrived in Britain from France at the close of the Blitz after a difficult journey via Marseille, Casablanca and Lisbon. ‘The last stage of this long

in The forgotten French
Open Access (free)
Servicemen
Nicholas Atkin

French ships at Plymouth, except that he was already struggling to maintain control among both his men and officers, who were angered to see British civilians enjoying their summer holidays.145 Additionally, there were two captains, Le Chuiton and Guillaume, as well as two other captains whose names are not disclosed in the surviving records. Indeed, there is little on these men in surviving official Foreign Office and French Welfare files, except a letter of protest from Chartier of the Vichy consulate who believed their incarceration would play into the hands of

in The forgotten French
Open Access (free)
La colonie Française
Nicholas Atkin

. Having been furnished with the necessary papers by the British, she was astonished to be arrested eight days after her arrival. No explanation was given as to her internment, and she subsequently spent 279 days in prison, thirteen of which were spent in a ‘cachot’. She was eventually released on 11 June 1941, yet still no reason was given for her incarceration, which clearly distressed the nurse. In 2499 Chap5 7/4/03 2:44 pm Page 229 La colonie Française 229 early July, British censors intercepted a letter she sent from Portugal, where she had been deported, to

in The forgotten French
Open Access (free)
Melanie Giles

’ (Edmonds and Garner 2016 : n.p.). Outraged, the turf cutter passed the object on to Alan, knowing that ‘he’ll look after it better’. He did. In his hands this object becomes the ‘swaddledidaff’ of Strandloper (Garner 1996 ): the lucky stone that the Marton labourer, William Buckley, takes with him when he is transported to Australia ( Figure 4.9 ). He escapes incarceration and finds himself among an aboriginal community who see a very different suite of qualities in the stone to the blunt mineralogical description above. 4.9 The ‘swaddledidaff’ – a haematite

in Bog bodies
Gender and contemporary fantasies of witchcraft
Alison Rowlands

five times with thumbscrews during her final interrogation.121 After steadfastly refusing to confess to witchcraft she was released unpunished on 5 October, although the surety she had to swear before leaving gaol listed the allegations the Schürz family had made against her in tones which implied that they were more credible than Catharina’s denials of guilt.122 Mathes Leimbach was not tortured but, being old and infirm, suffered severely from the cold during his incarceration.123 He was released on 9 October but the trial proved to be his financial and physical

in Witchcraft narratives in Germany
Bonnie Evans

with autism to live independent and full lives to the limit of their potential’, ‘the right of people with autism to sexual and other relationships, including marriage, without exploitation or coercion’ and ‘the right of people with autism to freedom from fear or threat of unwarranted incarceration in psychiatric hospitals or any other restrictive institutions’. The declaration

in The metamorphosis of autism
Elizabeth Vandiver and Ralph Keen

of good works, arguing haughtily about the One Faith. From these things the Legate easily understood that Luther answered solely in words but held his mind fixed in its errors and opinions. Therefore the Legate said to him that, unless he recanted, he would be given to the censors, at the Pope’s command, to be bound. But Luther had heard that the Legate had a mandate for seizing and incarcerating both him and his comrade Staupitz. For this reason he was full of anxiety. Since Luther was forbidden to return into the Legate’s sight unless he recanted, he began

in Luther’s lives