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Introduction

A power perspective on Arctic governance

Elana Wilson Rowe

regional multilateralism. The region must be on the brink of a new cold war (a common media representation) or saturated with warm, comprehensive cooperation (a counter-​representation by Arctic states, including Russia). This book avoids testing the outer extremes of these ‘either/​or’ dichotomies about the cross-​border politics of the Arctic. Rather, the volume seeks to pose and explore a question that sheds light on the contested, but largely cooperative, nature of Arctic governance in the post-​Cold War period: how have and how do relations of power matter in

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Tony Fitzpatrick

universalism (to which they are not necessarily opposed) can be embodied in market relations, because markets treat everyone the same. Conversely, some on the Left have been critical of universalism in theory, but not necessarily in practice. They allege that universalism has either neglected or even suppressed a spectrum of social identities, categorical boundaries and cultural boundaries by implicitly treating white, heterosexual, able-bodied men as the normative ideal (Butler, 1990). This does not mean that universal services should be abandoned, merely that universality

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Series:

Neil McNaughton

overseas customers, it was felt by many that Britain would suffer. Among the problems of the economy were lack of capital investment, low levels of labour productivity, unsettled industrial relations and poor management. Britain seemed to lag behind its European partners in all these areas. Worse still, the British market was now thrown wide open to European exporters. The new economic structure While Britain was moving from being a world imperial power to a European player, the nature of its economy was also changing. The old, traditional industries steadily declined

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Vivien Walsh, Carole Cohen and Albert Richards

, within the innovating firm it is increasingly likely that cost centres and other forms of ‘market’ mechanism will have been introduced, so that one department may have to sell its services and other output, literally as well as figuratively, to another. Departments are now linked by market-type relations as well as by hierarchical management structures. This was also the case in Nimrod (and Hermes). At the same time, there has been an increasing tendency towards partnerships between organisations, including between potentially competing firms, in the production of

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Neil McNaughton

The development Issues concerningofwomen European integration The development of European integration 191 13 ➤ Review of the progress towards greater integration in Europe since the 1950s ➤ An identification of the key stages in integration ➤ Explanations of the different forms of integration which have emerged ➤ The main issues concerning integration ➤ Speculation concerning the future course of integration POST-WAR EUROPE After two world wars, both of which devastated European industry and threatened permanently to sour relations between its states, Europe

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Conclusion

Post-crisis Asia – economic recovery, September 11, 2001 and the challenges ahead

Shalendra D. Sharma

growing intra-Asian trade and 342 Conclusion: after September 11, 2001 demand from the European Union will help to fill the void, there is little doubt that Japan’s recovery is crucial (at least, in the short term) to the region’s recovery. Over the long term, Japan’s importance as a market for Asian exports and a source of long-term direct capital to the region will gradually diminish. Fourth, the Asian crisis was not a current-account, but a capital-account crisis. Conventional current-account crises are caused by the deterioration of domestic macroeconomic

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What matters is what works

The Third Way and the case of the Private Finance Initiative

Eric Shaw

. Pragmatism has been defined by one sympathetic commentator as a ‘a technical and hands-on orientation’ focusing first on the detail of ‘what works’ and what can be achieved within ‘the constraints of empirical and political realities’. 10 In the past (it is contended) Labour was, on grounds of dogma, stubbornly opposed to reliance on the private sector and market disciplines for

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EU development cooperation

From model to symbol?

Karin Arts and Anna K. Dickson

prompted calls for a single external relations Commissioner within a reformed Commission. Nevertheless, there is a noticeable trend towards enlarging the scope of activities carried out at the Community level (Edwards and Regelsberger, 1990: 4). The Community now has relations with almost all developing countries. Some are with individual states, for example Cuba. Others are with regional organisations, for example the Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN) and Mercado Comun del Sur (MERCOSUR; the Southern common market). Yet others apply to groups of trans

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Conclusion

Quality and processes of qualification

Series:

Mark Harvey, Andrew McMeekin and Alan Warde

ascriptions of quality alters the relations between the actors. In this book we have directed comparatively little attention up-stream. Marsden is an exception, in that he explores how quality is associated among producers in Wales with expensive local niche produce. Academics sometime succumb to the same temptation to consider quality as that which is not mass produced, to forget that consistency and low cost are attributes which appeal positively to a large section of the population. But in terms of producers appealing to niche markets – a practice which can only increase

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Richard Parrish

debate has taken on a new dimension. Commercial pressures and the public’s desire to see topclass competition has fuelled the internationalisation of sport. To regulate this cross-border activity, sports governing bodies have established rules governing relations between participants. The international and nongovernmental character of modern sport has not however ushered in for sport a new form of international autonomy insulated from law. The growth of the EU’s Single Market has been central to the internationalisation of sports law. The re-regulation of sport has