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‘Gothicism’, ‘historicism’, and the overlap of fictional modes from Thomas Leland to Walter Scott
Christina Morin

) Despite Strongbow's evident longing for his own age, the novel elsewhere shows a confirmed resignation to the passage of time. In particular, Strongbow's invasion of Ireland is depicted as a necessary and beneficial step that benefited both Ireland and Britain as a whole: ‘Accompanying Strongbow's polemic against [modern] luxury and corruption’, Watt argues, ‘is a myth of manifest destiny which promotes Ireland's role as “an invaluable portion of the British Empire!” ’ 70 White ultimately refrains from denouncing Strongbow

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
Open Access (free)
Regina Maria Roche, the Minerva Press, and the bibliographic spread of Irish gothic fiction
Christina Morin

hyper-nationalist loop’ Hoeveler identified in The children of the abbey , these journeys reflect contemporary patterns of short- and long-term Irish and English migration and emigration, colonial expansion, and popular tourism routes. More importantly, at least in terms of this discussion, they speak to expanding bibliographic networks and the new transnational story of books themselves. Circulated throughout Britain, Europe, North and South America, and the British Empire, Roche's novels introduced readers to elements of Irish culture, history

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829