Search results

You are looking at 1 - 8 of 8 items for :

  • "British Empire" x
  • Manchester Film and Media Studies x
  • Film, Media and Music x
Clear All
Queen Victoria, photography and film at the fin de siècle
Ian Christie

being shown throughout Britain and the British Empire, as well as elsewhere, has hardly been assessed. Nor has the relationship between Victoria’s long-standing interest in photography, still very much in evidence at the time of the Jubilee, and her response to ‘animated photography’. While John Plunkett has argued convincingly for seeing Victoria as ‘media made’, his focus is primarily on ‘the tremendous

in The British monarchy on screen
An allegory of imperial rapport
Deirdre Gilfedder

The hegemonic ideology of the early decades of the twentieth century, however, remained loyalism. Defined as personal allegiance to the sovereign, it was conceived as the uniting thread of the British Empire, as it was supposed to override religious or ethnic affiliation. 17 A British subject in the 1930s was still defined as one who ‘recognized the King as his Lord’, and owed allegiance to the King

in The British monarchy on screen
A lost epic of the reign of Victoria
Jude Cowan Montague

Queen showed that such patriotic product was not going to reap box-office success in America and change the fortunes of British cinema in the overseas market, whereas in the territories of the British Empire the film netted an impressive £35,000. Even before the distribution of Sixty Years a Queen had run its course, Samuelson was able to position himself as a major film manufacturer. As early as 23

in The British monarchy on screen
James Downs

sites with which it deals. … I am speaking not merely of a piece of motion picture entertainment, but of what is potentially the greatest piece of British Empire propaganda that has yet been attempted by the cinema. Grandcourt proceeded to stress the patriotic appeal of the film, asking for royal co-operation ‘to

in The British monarchy on screen
Open Access (free)
The King’s Speech as melodrama
Nicola Rehling

other words, builds on cultural representations of the Second World War as ‘our finest hour’, a time of unparalleled national unity. Inevitably, we read this scene with our extra-textual knowledge of the Allies’ victory, of George VI’s and Queen Elizabeth’s popularity (their refusing to leave London during the Blitz now well established in cultural mythology), the imminent break-up of the British Empire and the

in The British monarchy on screen
Mandy Merck

Elizabeth I. Moreover, Mirren is an aristocrat among film stars, who has played classical queens like Cleopatra and Phèdre on the stage, whose supposed descent from the actual Russian aristocracy was remarked on the film’s debut and who was dubbed a Dame of the British Empire soon afterwards. In 1994 she portrayed Queen Charlotte in The Madness of King George and in the 2005 HBO series, Elizabeth I , she

in The British monarchy on screen
Open Access (free)
The Queen in Australia
Jane Landman

. 17 Caroline Elkins, ‘The reassertion of the British Empire in Southeast Asia’, Journal of Interdisciplinary History 19:3 (Winter 2009), p. 365; also see David Reynolds, ‘Empire region, world: the international context of Australian foreign policy since 1939’, Australian Journal of Politics and History 51:3 (2005 ), p. 348

in The British monarchy on screen
Open Access (free)
Mandy Merck

back to the abdication, which results in Prince Bertie’s reluctant ascent to the throne. Opening with his agonised stammering at the British Empire Exhibition of 1925 and closing at the declaration of war in 1939 with a BBC radio address to his imperial subjects, the film portrays the healing of the monarchy by its loyal, if impertinent, colonial vassal. As Deidre Gilfedder observes, The King’s Speech follows the

in The British monarchy on screen