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Open Access (free)
Postcolonial governance and the policing of family
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Bordering intimacy is a study of how borders and dominant forms of intimacy, such as family, are central to the governance of postcolonial states such as Britain. The book explores the connected history between contemporary border regimes and the policing of family with the role of borders under European and British empires. Building upon postcolonial, decolonial and black feminist theory, the investigation centres on how colonial bordering is remade in contemporary Britain through appeals to protect, sustain and make family life. Not only was family central to the making of colonial racism but claims to family continue to remake, shore up but also hide the organisation of racialised violence in liberal states. Drawing on historical investigations, the book investigates the continuity of colonial rule in numerous areas of contemporary government – family visa regimes, the policing of sham marriages, counterterror strategies, deprivation of citizenship, policing tactics, integration policy. In doing this, the book re-theorises how we think of the connection between liberal government, race, family, borders and empire. In using Britain as a case, this opens up further insights into the international/global circulations of liberal empire and its relationship to violence.

Open Access (free)
‘Ordinary’ people and immigration politics
Hannah Jones
,
Yasmin Gunaratnam
,
Gargi Bhattacharyya
,
William Davies
,
Sukhwant Dhaliwal
,
Emma Jackson
, and
Roiyah Saltus

, saw a large number of new arrivals from around the world, and in a relatively short period of time. The 2004 enlargement of the EU, plus the UK's decision not to restrict access to citizenship for the new entrants, greatly increased the levels of immigration from within the EU (Vargas-Silva and Markaki, 2015 ). In the first decade of the twenty-first century, British political debate in Britain led by Tony Blair as Prime Minister focused on

in Go home?
Open Access (free)
Tony Fitzpatrick

economic injustice, state action is required to rectify the flaws of capitalism, though a state which is still limited in scope and ambition lest the spaces of individual liberty be undermined. New liberalism had all but vanished by the First World War, after which British politics was dominated by a damaging standoff between conservatism and socialism. But with the eventual discrediting of socialism, the way was open for a rejuvenation of new liberal ideas in the form of a social democratic politics that has divested itself of socialist myths. This is an interpretation

in After the new social democracy
Open Access (free)
Transgressing the cordon sanitaire: understanding the English Defence League as a social movement
Hilary Pilkington

, empirical data also show that Muslim communities are well integrated on indicators measuring support for democracy (trust and efficacy) and sense of belonging to Britain (Sobolewska, 2010: 41). Citizenship Survey data show that levels of trust in British political institutions among Muslims are similar to, or higher than, those of non-Muslims (Bleich and Maxwell, 2012: 48). Notwithstanding the fact that Muslim respondents are most likely to claim that religion is an important, or the most important, part of their identity, these data also indicate that their levels of

in Loud and proud
Open Access (free)
Hannah Jones
,
Yasmin Gunaratnam
,
Gargi Bhattacharyya
,
William Davies
,
Sukhwant Dhaliwal
,
Emma Jackson
, and
Roiyah Saltus

which immigration and immigration enforcement emerge as a problem are continually evolving. This includes not only how categories of ‘them’ and ‘us’ are open to revision but also how these categories can be mediated by moments of, and movements between, indifference, welcome, compassion and conviviality (see Brah, 2012/1999 ; Jones and Jackson, 2014 ). In the months following the Paris attacks, Britain's political debate increasingly focused

in Go home?
Hannah Jones
,
Yasmin Gunaratnam
,
Gargi Bhattacharyya
,
William Davies
,
Sukhwant Dhaliwal
,
Emma Jackson
, and
Roiyah Saltus

that political rhetoric and policy ends up focused instead on seeking to shape attitudes and emotions of (sections of) the public. Attempts to speak scientifically or realistically about this policy issue are no longer viewed as legitimate by large swathes of the British political class. Postliberalism does not offer a new paradigm of governmentality, as its purpose is to attack the very idea of centralised, technocratic

in Go home?
Open Access (free)
Anti-racist scholar-activism and the neoliberal-imperial-institutionally-racist university
Remi Joseph-Salisbury
and
Laura Connelly

Institute of Race Relations notes, ‘where racism in Britain is acknowledged in the report, the emphasis is placed on online abuse, which is very much in line with the wider drift in British politics and society away from understanding racism in terms of structural factors and locating it instead in prejudice and bigotry’. 28 The downplaying and denial of institutional racism diverges notably from the findings of the 1999 Macpherson Report, commissioned by the then UK Home Secretary Jack Straw into the police (mis

in Anti-racist scholar-activism
Open Access (free)
Gareth Millward

were always mediated through these interactions – and the complex ways in which these shone through tell us much about post-war British politics. Whatever our conception of “the public”, public health has maintained a disciplinary function, and much has been written about how governance structures acted upon the public from a medical perspective. 45 Somewhat paradoxically, the imprecision of definitions of “the public” and “public health” have, according to Jane Lewis, been both a strength and a weakness of public health governance and the

in Vaccinating Britain
Open Access (free)
Gareth Millward

was a problem, authorities were at no great pains to stress it. Indeed, they saw parents’ enthusiasm as a sign that modern preventative health care would be seen as a civic duty – states would be obliged to provide services, and good citizens would actively use them. 13 While the British political classes had committed to the social rights of a comprehensive welfare state based on the war-time Beveridge Report, they also came to expect certain behaviours in return. 14 These trends were common in the West during the twentieth century, and accelerated after 1945

in Vaccinating Britain
Open Access (free)
Gareth Millward

epidemiological merit to the proposals. 95 James Stewart has also collated a rich public history of the outbreak, including contemporary materials and oral histories with survivors. 96 As these demonstrate, routine childhood vaccination was one talking point among many; and certainly not the most important. 97 The outbreak became a scandal because it touched a raw nerve in British politics with regard to Commonwealth immigration, rather than because it was a medical crisis per se. Control of immigration was the main concern. It was therefore as much about protecting Britain

in Vaccinating Britain