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A bird’s eye view of intervention with emphasis on Britain, 1875–78
Alexis Heraclides and Ada Dialla

, Austria–Hungary would annex Bosnia and Herzegovina; Russia would annex Bessarabia, which it had lost with the 1856 Paris Treaty; Bulgaria, Rumelia and Albania were to become autonomous states; and Thessaly and Crete would be annexed by Greece. If the Ottoman Empire collapsed, Constantinople was to become a free city. 26 Disraeli, Gladstone and the British public Apart from apprehension about Russia, another reason for Britain’s aloofness was

in Humanitarian intervention in the long nineteenth century
Open Access (free)
Television and the politics of British humanitarianism
Andrew Jones

of the British public in development issues and tackling global poverty. This thinking was apparent when Oxfam announced in 1973 (only a month before The Unknown Famine aired) that it would cease using such imagery altogether, and instead ‘educate rather than incite pity’. The agency added that ‘people have become blunted by disaster, so we now intend to concentrate on the constructive aspect of our work in

in Global humanitarianism and media culture
New stories on rafted ice
Elana Wilson Rowe

. The thirst for exploration also connected to an increasingly literate British public, eager to consume reports of distant land and imperial heroism. This reading public was a market for publishing revenues, and a key audience for narratives of imperial greatness and national identity (English, 2013: 47–​48). The disappearance of Franklin’s crew and ships sparked rescue expeditions throughout the late 1840s and 1850. The location of the sunken ships was deemed a mystery until Parks Canada divers identified the wreckage in 2014. However, local Inuit had long told

in Arctic governance
Jonathan Colman

agreed to send men to Vietnam then the controversy of the US stand there might be inflamed still further should the facts emerge of the recourse to ‘mercenaries’. Clive Ponting has indicated persuasively that in rejecting the ‘a battalion for a billion’ approach, Johnson understood that, given feelings in the Labour Party and among the British public, Wilson would not be able to commit British troops to Vietnam, and to press

in A ‘special relationship’?
From starving children to satirical saviours
Rachel Tavernor

, including Save the Children, Oxfam and Christian Aid. 4 The campaign broadly aimed to tackle extreme international hunger by rallying the British public to use their national citizenship to pressure their MPs, prime minister and chancellor to take political action on aid, tax avoidance, biofuels and government transparency. Due to a limited financial budget, the Enough Food IF campaign organisers predominantly communicated their

in Global humanitarianism and media culture
The Third Way and the case of the Private Finance Initiative
Eric Shaw

sector in Britain ’, Public Administration Review , 61 ( 5 ). Blair , T. ( 1999 ) Speech to the British Venture Capitalist Association , London , July . Blair , T. ( 2001 ) Speech on public service reform , October . Boyle , S. and Harrison , A. ( 2000 ) Investing in Health Buildings: Public

in The Third Way and beyond
Thomas Robb

the safety net Although the issue of obtaining the safety net remained unresolved, Callaghan envisaged that it would be announced simultaneously, or very soon after Britain publicly announced its application for an IMF loan. He also wanted the safety net to be in the region of $3.5 billion.103 Callaghan agreed to the terms of the IMF loan on the proviso that the safety net would be swiftly granted, and this was certainly the impression Ford had given to Callaghan.104 Ford remained unconvinced as to whether the US should agree to such a loan but, by 3 December 1976

in A strained partnership?
Open Access (free)
Thomas Robb

4 Wilson returns 1974–76 You have to operate on the assumption that Great Britain is through. Henry Kissinger to President Ford, October 19741 Introduction Heath’s final months in office were dominated by economic and social problems. Continuing trouble with the trade union movement had resulted in a three-day working week being enforced, and the ongoing oil embargo had led to the British public having to restrict their energy use. This set of circumstances had led to what one popular British newspaper would term as Heath’s ‘Long agony in No. 10’.2 Following

in A strained partnership?
Jonathan Colman

might soon face ‘the need for fairly stringent economic measures to control the growing inflationary tendencies in the American economy’. Johnson ‘may therefore see a strong vested interest in praising the Prime Minister’s courage, in endorsing HMG’s economic policies and, of course, in the success of a programme of retrenchment which is going to hurt quite a large section of the British public’. Underneath the

in A ‘special relationship’?
Patrick Doyle

Government. Æ also pursued a publicity campaign aimed at the British public. 124 In 1920, he published A Plea for Justice , which called for a public inquiry into the attacks by ‘[t]he armed forces of the Crown … [who] burned down factories, creameries, mills stores, barns and private-dwelling houses’. Æ understood the rationale behind these attacks as a punitive response calculated to lead ‘to the wrecking of any enterprise in the neighbourhood the destruction of which would inflict widespread injury and hurt the interests of the greatest number of

in Civilising rural Ireland