Search results

Paul Henley

, including also his oblique but highly controversial ‘fly-on-the-wall’ representations of British elites in one-off documentaries such as The Fishing Party (1986) and later, The Dinner Party (1997) . Other notable examples of para-ethnographic works on British television in the 1990s include two remarkable series that Phil Agland shot in China. The first, Beyond the Clouds , in seven parts and broadcast in 1994, was filmed in and around the

in Beyond observation
Open Access (free)
A history of authorship in ethnographic film
Author: Paul Henley

Beyond Observation offers a historical analysis of ethnographic film from the birth of cinema in 1895 until 2015. It covers a large number of films made in a broad range of styles, in many different parts of the world, from the Arctic to Africa, from urban China to rural Vermont. It is the first extensive historical account of its kind and will be accessible to students and lecturers in visual anthropology as well as to those previously unfamiliar with ethnographic film.

Among the early genres that Paul Henley discusses are French reportage films, the Soviet kulturfilm, the US travelogue, the classic documentaries of Robert Flaherty and Basil Wright, as well as the more academic films of Margaret Mead and Gregory Bateson. Among the leading film-makers of the post-war period, he discusses Jean Rouch, John Marshall and Robert Gardner, as well as the emergence of Observational Cinema in the 1970s. He also considers ‘indigenous media’ projects of the 1980s, and the ethnographic films that flourished on British television until the 1990s.

In the final part, he examines the recent films of David and Judith MacDougall, the Harvard Sensory Media Lab, and a range of films authored in a participatory manner, as possible models for the future.

Paul Henley

The later years of Disappearing World : variations in content Although there were also a number of other innovations in the later years of the strand, these were more to do with issues of content than with transformations in film-making praxis. Two of the later series were shot in Communist states prior to the end of the Cold War, one in Mongolia, broadcast in 1975 and consisting of two films, the other in the People's Republic of China, which was broadcast in 1983 and consisted of three films. To a degree that is difficult to appreciate today

in Beyond observation
Recent films of David and Judith MacDougall
Paul Henley

Since then, the MacDougalls have released a total of fifteen films between them. Apart from one solo film that David made in Sardinia and another that Judith made in China, all these films have been made in India. Moreover, the great majority of these Indian films have concerned the lives of children living in institutions of one kind or another. With one exception, these films about children have all been made by David working alone. When all these post-AIAS works are added together, they amount to almost half the MacDougalls’ total oeuvre to date. In terms of the

in Beyond observation
Open Access (free)
Sequence and the rise of auteurism in 1950s Britain
Erik Hedling

like If… and O Lucky Man. When Anderson’s late, elegiac film The Whales of August (1987) was released, Richard Combs claimed that Anderson in it for once fulfilled the promises of Sequence. 34 He did occasionally work in the Sequence mode – never more so than in a film that was never actually released, Wham in China (1986), originally a feature-length documentary

in British cinema of the 1950s
Robert Burgoyne

China, and expressing amazement about the atheism, collective ownership and antimaterialism that he found there. Lennon appears to respond to Gump’s descriptions of life in China with the word ‘Imagine!’, which he repeats after all of Gump’s incredulous descriptions. As with the George Wallace and John F. Kennedy sequences, Lennon’s recorded words are culled from the archive

in Memory and popular film
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

advertising only took around $19 million box office. Nixon was a man of great talent, but his own worst enemy. Nixon did make some progress with the Soviet Union and China, and in that respect he may, like Kennedy, have crossed a line –​and it has even been suggested that Watergate might have been a response from the establishment to that development. Stone: U Turn was a story about incest and was released as an R; but by 1997 things had started to loosen up a little. However, by the time of Alexander I discovered that the gay relationship with Hephaestion was still a

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
The Queen in Australia
Jane Landman

peaceful Crown Colony not yet associated with any of the topical colonial demands for constitutional reform or national self-determination, and not producing alarming reports of racial strife, economic distress, communist infiltration, or threats against the established order of government. 21 However, Chinese and

in The British monarchy on screen
Open Access (free)
Woman in a Dressing Gown
Melanie Williams

review for Tribune , suggests another possible interpretation: ‘Monstrous closeups of burnt toast and tea-cups fill the screen. Every speck of lather on Anthony Quayle’s face is blown up to twenty times its size. China bangs, a radio blares, and a plate smashes with a crash that nearly bursts the loud speaker.’ 9 Hill, like Godard, fails to grasp the possible justification for Thompson’s frequent focus on

in British cinema of the 1950s
Open Access (free)
Robert Hamer after Ealing
Philip Kemp

for the most part. A decade before the trumpeted naturalism of the British New Wave, Hamer was exploring townscapes far from the official picture-postcard locations. This is a scruffy, back-alley Britain of cracked pavements and corrugated-iron lean-to sheds. A petty crook’s deserted wife sits in a parlour stuffed with sad, tawdry knick-knacks – china cats, samplers, cheap reproductions, a portrait of

in British cinema of the 1950s