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A Toilet Revolution and its socio-eco-technical entanglements
Deljana Iossifova

Sanitation is entangled with material infrastructure, policy landscapes and everyday practices, encompassing underpinning value, belief and norm systems. In this chapter, I argue that sanitation must be studied as more than an engineered system in order to design targeted interventions towards more sustainable futures. I reflect on the ways in which ideals of the networked city have perpetuated urban governance, planning and design and look at the ways in which they are embedded within China’s ongoing Toilet Revolution. I then propose that practice theory, in

in Urban transformations and public health in the emergent city

Urban transformations and public health in the emergent city examines how urban health and wellbeing are shaped by migration, mobility, racism, sanitation and gender. Adopting a global focus, spanning Africa, Asia, Europe and Latin America, the essays in this volume bring together a wide selection of voices that explore the interface between social, medical and natural sciences. This interdisciplinary approach, moving beyond traditional approaches to urban research, offers a unique perspective on today’s cities and the challenges they face. Edited by Professor Michael Keith and Dr Andreza Aruska de Souza Santos, this volume also features contributions from leading thinkers on cities in Brazil, China, South Africa and the United Kingdom. This geographic diversity is matched by the breadth of their different fields, from mental health and gendered violence to sanitation and food systems. Together, they present a complex yet connected vision of a ‘new biopolitics’ in today’s metropolis, one that requires an innovative approach to urban scholarship regardless of geography or discipline. This volume, featuring chapters from a number of renowned authors including the former deputy mayor of Rio de Janeiro Luiz Eduardo Soares, is an important resource for anyone seeking to better understand the dynamics of urban change. With its focus on the everyday realities of urban living, from health services to public transport, it contains valuable lessons for academics, policy makers and practitioners alike.

Open Access (free)
City DNA, public health and a new urban imaginary
Michael Keith and Andreza Aruska de Souza Santos

history of comparative studies in the social sciences, but for the purposes of this volume it is perhaps most important to emphasise how different chapters make visible similar logics in rapidly changing empirical contexts. The emergence of four decades of exponential growth in China since Deng’s ‘opening up’ qualifies any suggestion that the country’s urban transformation constitutes a form of urbanism of the global south. The ‘modernisation’ of cities in Brazil and South Africa qualifies the extent to which urban transformation can be seen straightforwardly through a

in Urban transformations and public health in the emergent city
Open Access (free)
Urban transformation and public health in future cities
Michael Keith and Andreza Aruska de Souza Santos

volume we have drawn together a series of contributions that address pressing issues of urban public health. Our starting points are twofold. The first is the recognition that in the twenty-first century the majority of the globe’s urban populations will live in cities. The cities of continents that are at the heart of this volume in Latin America, Europe, Africa and Asia demonstrate different trajectories of historical and contemporary urbanisation and futures of urban growth. The examples we have brought together from cities in Brazil, UK, China and Africa are

in Urban transformations and public health in the emergent city
Open Access (free)
From an ‘infrastructural turn’ to the platform logics of logistics
Michael Keith and Andreza Aruska de Souza Santos

-based networks of tracking and tracing on the ground contrasted with the grim spectacle seen in the capital of global finance in New York. Between countries, differences were commonly attributed to the particular combinations of strong public health infrastructure, successful state surveillance of private mobility data and social control in places with strong state institutional capacity such as China and Korea, reflecting national political contexts and institutional forms. Clearly, what was at stake was a moment when global forces landed locally, reconfiguring the DNA of

in African cities and collaborative futures
Open Access (free)
Situating peripheries research in South Africa and Ethiopia
Paula Meth, Alison Todes, Sarah Charlton, Tatenda Mukwedeya, Jennifer Houghton, Tom Goodfellow, Metadel Sileshi Belihu, Zhengli Huang, Divine Mawuli Asafo, Sibongile Buthelezi, and Fikile Masikane

which impact employment opportunities. However, our findings show that this is often very varied locally, with adjacent neighbourhoods experiencing quite significant differences. Developments in such areas can strain viable infrastructure and service delivery at scale, requiring private-sector (including transnational) investments in the face of energy, telecommunications and water shortages (Simone, 2014 ; Todes, 2014 ). Major infrastructure projects financed by foreign aid or international assistance, particularly from China as in the case of Addis (e.g. the light

in African cities and collaborative futures
Open Access (free)
The bridge, the fund and insurance in Dar es Salaam
Irmelin Joelsson

– named after Julius Nyerere – on 19 April 2016 came with bold promises that Tanzania was to move from the fringes of the global economy to a more prominent place, as claimed by the president in the opening speech. The bridge was, after all, funded independently of foreign aid, in a south–south as well as south–east partnership, involving the same Chinese engineering company that in the 1970s built the famous TAZARA railway (connecting Tanzania with Zambia) and a consultant engineering firm from Egypt. More than eight decades earlier, plans for a bridge had been

in African cities and collaborative futures
Open Access (free)
Urban presence and uncertain futures in African cities
Michael Keith and Andreza Aruska de Souza Santos

significant increases in urban populations in the twenty-first century; in China, in India and in Africa in particular. Well-argued critiques of urban theory of the global north abound, drawing on postcolonial, feminist and other framings of urban life to contrast deliberately with the insights of the mainstream traditions of urban studies (Parnell and Robinson, 2012 ; Pieterse, 2010 ). Jennifer Robinson and Ananya Roy have gone so far as to argue that that the appeal to the universal speaks to a limited audience when the global urban majority live in cities that are

in African cities and collaborative futures
Nikolas Rose

Nick Manning on questions of mechanisms (for more details see Manning, 2019). In addition to this, the chapter draws on research supported by the following grants: the European Union’s Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation Programme funding for the Human Brain Project under Grant Agreement No. 720270; ESRC Award ES/L003074/1: A New Sociology for a New Century: Transforming the Relations between Sociology and Neuroscience, through a Study of Mental Life ; ESRC-NSFC Award ES/N010892/1: Urban Transformations in China; and an award for Mental Health, Migration and the

in Urban transformations and public health in the emergent city
Open Access (free)
Learning from communities in informal settlements in Durban, South Africa
Maria Christina Georgiadou and Claudia Loggia

. Sutherland and E. Braathen (eds), The politics of slums in the global south: Urban informality in Brazil, China, South Africa and Peru, 49–78 . Abingdon : Routledge . Watson , V. ( 2014 ). ‘ Co-production and collaboration in planning – The difference ’. Planning Theory and Practice , 15 ( 1 ): 62–76 . Wekesa , B. , Steyn , G

in African cities and collaborative futures