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Guerrilla nursing with the Friends Ambulance Unit, 1946–48
Susan Armstrong-Reid

10 Two China ‘gadabouts’: guerrilla nursing with the Friends Ambulance Unit, 1946–48 Susan Armstrong-Reid The Friends Ambulance Unit is an agency through which members of the Society of Friends and like-minded persons carry into action their deepest religious convictions and insights …. Through relief service we are able to express our sense of responsibility for and unity with our fellow human beings. We feel we need to bring food, clothing, and shelter to those in distress but far more important than even such vital material assistance, is the opportunity to

in Colonial caring
Coreen Anne McGuire

this type of breath was linked, at least for Ellis and his correspondents, with civility and racial purity. Costal breathing was connected only with women of the more civilised races. 55 For example, Ellis published his correspondence with Dr J. H. Kellogg (of cornflakes fame), who wrote: I observed the breathing of 20 Chinese women and the same number of Indian women, and I found the abdominal type very marked in every case … I examined several of the Cherokee and Chickesaw women in the Indian Territory. These women had all worn civilised dress, and some of

in Measuring difference, numbering normal
Open Access (free)
Coreen Anne McGuire

Subjects, Making Statistics in Post-Mao China ’, Medical Anthropology Quarterly , 17 : 1 ( 2003 ), 5 – 24 , p. 6. 129 Foucault , M. , The History of Sexuality: Volume One ( London : Penguin Books , 1976 ), p. 140 . 130 Ibid., p. 139. 131 Hacking, ‘Biopower and the Avalanche of Printed Numbers’. 132 Braun, Breathing Race into the Machine . 133 Heggie , V. , ‘ Testing Sex and Gender in Sports: Reinventing, Reimagining and Reconstructing Histories ’, Endeavour , 34 : 4 ( 2010 ), 157 – 163 . 134 Ibid., p. 157. 135 Stone, Breeding

in Measuring difference, numbering normal
Dr Williams’ Pink Pills for Pale People and the hybrid pathways of Chinese modernity
Alice Tsay

I don't suppose there is a proprietary medicine manufacturer of importance in any part of the world who has not, at one time or another, encouraged his imagination to play with the idea of the prosperous business he might build up, and the wealth he might accumulate, if he could, by some means, convince a reasonable number of Chinese of the efficiency of his remedies. 2

in Progress and pathology
Open Access (free)
A history of colonial and post-colonial nursing
Editors: Helen Sweet and Sue Hawkins

Colonial Caring covers over a century of colonial nursing by nurses from a wide range of countries including: Denmark, Britain, USA, Holland and Italy; with the colonised countries including South Africa, Australia, New Zealand, Ethiopia, Nigeria, India, Indonesia (Dutch East Indies) and the Danish West Indies. It presents unique perspectives from which to interrogate colonialism and post-colonialism including aspects of race, cultural difference and implications of warfare and politics upon nursing. Viewing nursing’s development under colonial and post-colonial rule reveals different faces of a profession that superficially may appear to be consistent and coherent, yet in reality is constantly reinventing itself. Considering such areas as transnational relationships, class, gender, race and politics, this book aims to present current work in progress within the field, to better understand the complex entanglements in nursing’s development as it was imagined and practised in local imperial, colonial and post-colonial contexts. Taking a chronologically-based structure, early chapters examine nursing in situations of conflict in the post-Crimean period from the Indian Rebellion to the Anglo-Boer War. Recruitment, professionalisation of nursing and of military nursing in particular, are therefore considered before moving deeper into the twentieth century reflecting upon later periods of colonialism in which religion and humanitarianism become more central. Drawing from a wide range of sources from official documents to diaries, memoirs and oral sources, and using a variety of methodologies including qualitative and quantitative approaches, the book represents ground-breaking work.

Open Access (free)
Medicine and culture in the nineteenth century

This collaborative volume explores changing perceptions of health and disease in the context of the burgeoning global modernities of the long nineteenth century. During this period, popular and medical understandings of the mind and body were challenged, modified, and reframed by the politics and structures of ‘modern life’, understood in industrial, social, commercial, and technological terms. Bringing together work by leading international scholars, this volume demonstrates how a multiplicity of medical practices were organised around new and evolving definitions of the modern self. The study offers varying and culturally specific definitions of what constituted medical modernity for practitioners around the world in this period. Chapters examine the ways in which cancer, suicide, and social degeneration were seen as products of the stresses and strains of ‘new’ ways of living in the nineteenth century, and explore the legal, institutional, and intellectual changes that contributed to both positive and negative understandings of modern medical practice. The volume traces the ways in which physiological and psychological problems were being constituted in relation to each other, and to their social contexts, and offers new ways of contextualising the problems of modernity facing us in the twenty-first century.

Disease, conflict and nursing in the British Empire, 1880–1914
Angharad Fletcher

geography all played their part; and comparisons between such sites expose municipal deficiencies, assigned culpability and administrative solutions that were often strikingly similar. Case study: plague in Hong Kong Carol Benedict argues that the outbreak later referred to globally as the third plague pandemic probably originated in the Chinese 46 Imperial sisters in Hong Kong province of Yunnan in the 1850s. Intermittent rebellions against the Qing court, and a lucrative trade in opium and tin, provided corridors for inland disease reservoirs to costal ports such as

in Colonial caring
Open Access (free)
Rima D. Apple

China, the poverty of Māori in New Zealand and the isolation of Aboriginal settlements in Queensland. These situations were distinctly and often uncomfortably different from those in which the European nurses had trained and previously practised. Many faced unfamiliar languages. Some of the nurses learned the languages of their clients and their students; others struggled with and even without translators. Many faced unfamiliar local customs. Some were so convinced of the superiority of Western medicine and the imperial culture that they dismissed practices that were

in Colonial caring
Open Access (free)
Contextualising colonial and post-colonial nursing
Helen Sweet and Sue Hawkins

British response to a threat of a different kind – the emergence and subsequent rampage of plague through China and beyond at the end of the century. The authors offer a number of observations, including women’s reasons for volunteering to work in such challenging environments, far from home, and the personal as well as professional challenges they faced. Recruitment and the professionalisation of nursing, and of military nursing in particular, are therefore considered here, particularly focusing on themes of class and gender. Moving into the twentieth century the next

in Colonial caring
Open Access (free)
Melissa Dickson, Emilie Taylor-Brown, and Sally Shuttleworth

The present volume, which examines the correlations that were being drawn between notions of progress and pathology across a diverse range of socio-economic cultures in the long nineteenth century beginning with the French Revolution, interrogates such notions of exceptionalism. Our purview is deliberately transnational, drawing on case studies from Britain, America, France, Germany, Finland, Bengal, China, and the South Pacific, in order to provide rich comparative perspectives on medical responses to, and constructions of, modernity, while demonstrating that

in Progress and pathology