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Open Access (free)
A theatre maker in every sense
Brian Singleton

Katharina highly unlikely. Hesketh Pearson remembered how Brayton was credited as much as her husband for the production’s success: Lily Brayton was incomparably the best Katharina of her time, and both of them jumped at a bound to the front of their profession. It was a breathless, knockabout, rampageous show, played on broadly farcical lines, and the audiences rocked with laughter. Wherever it was ­performed it raised the roof […] (Pearson, 1950: 66) Looking back on the production, Claude McKay wrote of how ‘the pair took London by storm’, and noted Brayton

in Stage women, 1900–50
Open Access (free)
The Australian and New Zealand repertoires and fortunes of North American performers Margaret Anglin, Katherine Grey and Muriel Starr
Veronica Kelly

. Its publicity agent Claude McKay said of the Anglin tour that ‘[t]he theatre was comfortably filled throughout the season, but we were not turning crowds away’ (McKay, 1961: 110). Anglin’s group sailed to Australia from Vancouver on 23 May 1908 on the Aorangi, which was crammed with many other American performers. Aboard were the companies of the musical comedies The Red Mill and The Prince of Pilsen, plus fellow Irishwoman Ada Dwyer and other cast members of the rural comedy Mrs Wiggs of the Cabbage Patch. The Aorangi was not the only vessel of importance then upon

in Stage women, 1900–50