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Open Access (free)
Laura Chrisman

anticolonial voices that includes J.J. Thomas, Sri Aurobindo, Joseph Casely Hayford, Claude McKay, Rabindranath Tagore and Sol Plaatje.9 I emphasise these elements and shifts in order to underscore my contention that postcolonial studies has always been a field of divergent orientations, and that Marxist and anti-colonial perspectives have acquired more popular currency than was theirs in the 1980s and early 1990s. But this is not to suggest that there is now no need for a collection of ‘contraventions’: the critical tendencies that I engage with in this book remain

in Postcolonial contraventions
Open Access (free)
Janelle Joseph

ones, and the importance of homosocial relationships. The cricket grounds then, like the seafaring communities of the twentieth century captured by Nassy Brown, Paul Gilroy and Claude McKay, are transnational communities whose “history is a verbal story, whose record lies in an oral and aural culture submerged beneath the national print cultures” (Stephens, 2005 , p. 183). The MCSC members, as

in Sport in the Black Atlantic
Open Access (free)
Janelle Joseph

nostalgia may facilitate the kind of coherence, consistency, and sense of identity that each of us so desperately needs.” Even if migrants are unable to make a physical trip to their place of origin, they can access the homeland and the past through shared nostalgic memories. As Stephens ( 2005 ) writes of one of Claude McKay’s black diasporic literary characters, “community is enacted in the act of telling

in Sport in the Black Atlantic
Open Access (free)
Janelle Joseph

‘black home’ and its attendant values, domesticity and heterosexuality,” as Stephens ( 2005 , p. 146) writes of the black/Caribbean characters of Claude McKay’s novel, Home to Harlem . While I do not wish to reinforce a strict home = respectability/street = reputation divide – as there are examples of men and women in the MCSC who defy this binary – it is clear that among MCSC members the distinct

in Sport in the Black Atlantic