Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 31 items for :

  • "Colonialism" x
  • Manchester Political Studies x
Clear All
Open Access (free)
Interrogating civilisational analysis in a global age

Contemporary civilisational analysis has emerged in the post-Cold War period as a forming but already controversial field of scholarship. This book focuses on the scholarship produced in this field since the 1970s. It begins with anthropological axioms posited by Ibn Khaldun, Simon Bolivar and George Pachymeres. Three conceptual images of civilisations are prominent in the field. First, civilisations are conceived as socio-cultural units, entities or blocs in an 'integrationist' image. They emerge out of long-term uneven historical processes. Finally, in a 'relational' image civilisations are believed to gain definition and institute developmental patterns through inter-societal and inter-cultural encounters. The book traces the history of semantic developments of the notions of 'civilisation' and 'civilisations' coextensive with the expansion of Europe's empires and consubstantial with colonialism. Early modernities are more important in the long formation of capitalism. Outlining the conceptual framework of inter-civilisational engagement, the book analytically plots the ties instituted by human imaginaries across four dimensions of inter-civilisational engagement. It also interrogates the relationship between oceans, seas and civilisations. Oceanian civilisation exhibits patterns of deep engagement and connection. Though damaged, Pacific cultures have invoked their own counter-imaginary in closer proximity to past islander experiences. Collective memory provides resources for coping with critical issues. The book also explores Latin American and Japanese experiences that shed light on the engagement of civilisations, applying the model of inter-civilisational engagement to modern perspectives in culture and the arts, politics, theology and political economy.

Open Access (free)
Ontologies of connection, reconstruction of memory

migration. Through voyaging and migration, islander societies expanded, creating and sustaining zones of engagement for millennia before Europeans came. Travel stimulated an imaginary of exchange, the second theme. Exchange cannot be understood with a utilitarian mindset; it is rather an expression of relationship, association and alliance –​engagement broadly speaking. The third theme is the new world context. European colonialism conjoined the Pacific to other civilisations in more extensive engagement. This was a violent and disordering historical experience for the

in Debating civilisations
Imaginaries, power, connected worlds

. Unprecedented waves of migration to and within the Atlantic world patterned the institution of American societies. Colonialism structured migration in Asia even more than in the second period. Tens of millions of indentured contract labourers moved. Some returned to their countries of origin; many joined new communities that became entrenched over time. Chinese and Indian traders were prominent in dealings with the new colonisers and lived in enclave communities of their own, whether within Asia and the Pacific or in southern or eastern Africa. Distinctly new migratory routes

in Debating civilisations

rise of new international actors; neo-colonialism . globalisation The process by which economic, political and cultural power and influence are transferred to organisations such as multinational corporations and so removed from the control of those most affected by them. This involves the increasing interdependence of states, social and economic organisations and individuals in the

in Understanding political ideas and movements
Open Access (free)
Identities and incitements

agents of colonialism, diverse agendas of empire. 9 On the one hand, the racial mythologies and the homespun lifestyles of colonizers sought to blur such fault lines, often invoking an exclusive time-space of European (and Euro-American) folk. On the other, divisions between different colonialist groups also stood highlighted within everyday representations and quotidian practices in distinct contexts

in Subjects of modernity
Open Access (free)
Uses and critiques of ‘civilisation’

-​century perspectives in turn have a pre-​history in the development of a vocabulary of related terms and a discourse around civilisations bound up with experiences of colonialism. Before illustrating the three kinds of uses of ‘civilisation’ and ‘civilisations’, I want to trace the history of semantic developments of the notions of ‘civilisation’ and ‘civilisations’ coextensive with the expansion of Europe’s empires and consubstantial with colonialism. Through this, we can see how the conceptual apparatus was implicated in colonialism and how it was mobilised in critiques of

in Debating civilisations
Open Access (free)
An introduction

follows.) Unraveling orientations: the postcolonial and the subaltern Around four decades ago, Edward Said’s seminal study, Orientalism , crucially underscored the mutual entailments of European colonialism and empire with Western knowledge and power. 10 Of course, long before the appearance of this work there existed several studies of European images

in Subjects of modernity

takes aim at the reproduction of essentialism that post-​colonial sociologists perceive in comparative studies of civilisations. Furthermore, post-​ colonial sociologists are explicitly critical of the comparative sociology of multiple modernities on the grounds that it fails to meets its own stated objective of going beyond Eurocentrism. Their critiques home in on how comparative sociologists have retained an unreconstructed notion of modernity incapable of reflecting the breadth of historical experiences of colonialism. Between the two fields there are significant

in Debating civilisations
Open Access (free)
Seas, oceans and civilisations

coupled with the nascent institutions of imperial power, oceanic imaginaries produced maritime empires with goals for conquest via water rather than over land. Europe’s Atlantic seaboard states constructed imperial states of this kind. Collectively, they subjected oceanic space to a higher order of naval and 115 Saltwater horizons 115 juridical power, with far-​reaching consequences. Oceans and seas have been defined as zones of colonialism, especially over the course of the last five centuries (Bentley et al., 2007; Klein and MacKenthun, 2004). A goal of Europe

in Debating civilisations
Open Access (free)
Time and space

the “pre-political,” Guha rendered this historical subject as completely coeval with and a co-constituent of processes of politics under colonialism. 2 On the other hand, the sensibilities of a recuperative paternalism – alongside the procedures of a somewhat salvage scholarly style – meant that within the project the meanings and motivations of these peoples appeared filtered through the master

in Subjects of modernity