Search results

Open Access (free)
Negotiating sovereign claims in Oaxacan post-mortem repatriation
Lars Ove Trans

5 Travelling corpses: negotiating sovereign claims in Oaxacan post-mortem repatriation Lars Ove Trans This chapter explores the process of death and repatriation of a Mexican migrant, Jacinto, from his home in Los Angeles to his native village of San Pedro Yalehua, a Zapotec Indian community located in the Sierra Juárez mountain range in the southern state of Oaxaca.1 In this process, Jacinto’s close relatives suddenly find themselves in a situation where they have to navigate the claims of various different authorities representing states (local and federal

in Governing the dead
Open Access (free)
Finn Stepputat

understand sovereignty as an effect of practices that are fundamentally related to the body and to issues of life and death. In this prism, the death of a person represents an occasion for the performance of sovereignty, not only for territorial states but also Introduction 5 for a range of sub-, trans- and supra-national entities that seek to claim or produce autonomous domains of power: religious communities, nations (not always coinciding with states), village and ethnic communities, drug cartels and gangs, insurgents, vigilantes, private security companies

in Governing the dead
Open Access (free)
Recorded memories and diasporic identity in the archive of Giuseppe Chiaffitella
Nicola Scaldaferri

In this chapter, the topics explored in the book are approached from a new perspective, deriving from the analysis of a private archive, dating from the twentieth century, which includes written texts, photos, films and, above all, sound recordings. Thanks to these media we can retrace the story of an immigrant who, especially through his recordings of songs and voices of distant relatives, was able to reinforce the sense of community among emigrants in the USA. In this case, the community is no longer a local one, confined to a single village or a small

in Sonic ethnography
Open Access (free)
Music-making as creative intervention
Nicola Scaldaferri

musicians and through them with the local communities. Research then became synonymous with constant participation – musically active and intellectually alert – in religious festivals, pilgrimages and collective rituals. As analysed in a variety of contexts in this volume, these forms of sociality often represent the main opportunities to observe musical practices and intense sonic involvement beyond the specificities of their religious implications. Such a methodology requires first of all a performative conception of research, especially in its fieldwork phase, as

in Sonic ethnography
Open Access (free)
Corpse-work in the prehistory of political boundaries
Richard Kernaghan

punishments meted out for transgressions of Party rules. Through a ritualised practice of revolutionary justice called ‘People’s Trials’ (juicios populares), the Party regularly sentenced to death those deemed political or social enemies. Rural communities under Sendero control served as prime locations for staging the juicios where residents were expected to participate in the executions to show their loyalty and subjection. People’s Trials were a technique for forming a revolutionary public: both in the sense of creating a political community and transforming the people

in Governing the dead
Open Access (free)
Identity, heritage and creative research practice in Basilicata, southern Italy

Sonic ethnography explores the role of sound-making and listening practices in the formation of local identities in the southern Italian region of Basilicata. The book uses a combination of text, photography and sound recording to investigate soundful cultural performances such as tree rituals, carnivals, pilgrimages, events promoting cultural heritage and more informal musical performances. Its approach demonstrates how in the acoustic domain tradition is made and disrupted, power struggles take place and acoustic communities are momentarily brought together in shared temporality and space. This book underlines how an attention to sound-making, recording and listening practices can bring innovative contributions to the ethnography of an area that has been studied by Italian and foreign scholars since the 1950s. The approaches of the classic anthropological scholarship on the region have become one of the forces at play in a complex field where discourses on a traditional past, politics of heritage and transnational diasporic communities interact. The book’s argument is carried forward not just by textual means, but also through the inclusion of six ‘sound-chapters’, that is, compositions of sound recordings themed so as to interact with the topic of the corresponding textual chapter, and through a large number of colour photographs. Two methodological chapters, respectively about doing research in sound and on photo-ethnography, explain the authors’ approach to field research and to the making of the book.

The revival of Lucanian wheat festivals
Lorenzo Ferrarini

-shaped offering that was to be taken on a procession on the day of the Madonna del Carmine later that month. Viggianello is located in a fertile valley which produces large quantities of wheat, yet the opportunity to get manually reaped wheat with long stalks could not be missed, since the agriculture of the area has been mostly mechanised. This was a domestic setting, a simple courtyard in which communal work on a devotional artefact reinforced the ties within the community. The spectacularisation taking place in Terranova di Pollino seemed not to have reached the Madonna del

in Sonic ethnography
Kathryn Cassidy

periods of migrant labour in Spain, reflected broader feelings of cross-border small trading as bringing shame upon a household. The specific dimensions of how Border crossings, shame and (re-)narrating the past 59 villagers expressed this shame within their local community will be explored in this chapter, through a focus on the relationship between these representations of the trade, its influence on how the past was narrated and the transtemporality of shame. Research into cross-border small trade rarely acknowledges the role of emotions other than the fear felt

in Migrating borders and moving times
Listening to the Campanaccio of San Mauro Forte
Nicola Scaldaferri

This chapter concerns the nocturnal parade of carriers of large cowbells in San Mauro Forte, a village of 1400 inhabitants, at 540m above sea level, within the hilly region west of the town of Matera. This event offers the opportunity to explore some crucial issues discussed in this book, in particular the role of sound in creating a sense of community beyond its symbolic functions, the function of rhythm and bodily involvement in the creation of a group identity, the relationship between sound and the space of the village where the event takes place, and the

in Sonic ethnography
Mass graves in post-war Malaysia
Frances Tay

harnessed to fashion a mutually cohesive narrative. Rather, ‘sectional narratives’ predicated upon these varied communal experiences have emerged.5 This divergence in experience resulted from the occupiers’ practice of race-specific policies, where the Chinese community in particular bore the brunt of Japanese aggression.6 In contrast, Japanese occupation policy was relatively supportive of the Malays and encouraging towards the Indians.7 The lack of an inclusive past is exacerbated by the continued marginalization of minority histories from official historiography of the

in Human remains and identification