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Reading James Baldwin’s Existential Hindsight in Go Tell It on the Mountain
Miller Wilbourn

This essay reads James Baldwin’s first novel, Go Tell It on the Mountain, through the lenses of European existentialism and Black existential thought to arrive at a new understanding of the novel itself as well as essential stages of its development. Archival sources and close reading reveal Baldwin’s historically and existentially informed artistic vision, summed up in the terms hindsight and insight. His thoughtful, uncomfortable engagement with the past leads to a recuperated relationship to the community and constitutes existential hindsight, which informs his inward understanding of himself—his insight. This investigation draws on various works from Baldwin’s fiction, essays, interviews, and correspondence to arrive at a better understanding of the writer’s intellectual and artistic development, focusing especially on the professed objectives behind, and major revisions of, the novel. I conclude the essay through a close reading of the conversion scene that constitutes Part Three of Go Tell It on the Mountain.

James Baldwin Review
Judie Newman

agreeable visit. How could they be otherwise? (Sunny, p. ix) Contradictorily, at the same time she states that she is publishing her travel letters only to correct ‘the persevering and deliberate attempts, in certain quarters, to misrepresent the circumstances which are here given’. (Sunny, p. ix). Letter XVII is entirely devoted to a defence of the Duchess, with Stowe extolling the ‘improvements’ in the estate (on which she had yet to set foot), detailing the mileage of new roads, the number of banks, schools, post offices, and even describing the complete conversion of

in Special relationships
Open Access (free)
Continuous theatre for a creative city
David Calder

architecture, graphic design, interior design, and digital media firms. The Blockhaus, the World War II-era bomb shelter for shipyard workers once occupied by architecture students, has undergone an architectural conversion to become La Fabrique, a centre of experimental music production and Nantes’ hippest concert venue. Proponents of the transition herald the creative quarter as crucial to Nantes’ long-term urban strategy: drawing on and nurturing the creativity of Nantes’ people, they argue, will position the city as a European Resurfacing 155 hub for the fastest

in Street theatre and the production of postindustrial space
Open Access (free)
Putting the countryside back to work
David Calder

members’ family experiences in mining and metallurgy. Most Metalovoice performers hail from the Nièvre industrial towns of Fourchambault and Varennes-Vauzelles, roughly 60 kilometres southwest of Corbigny. Metalovoice relocated to Corbigny from Nevers, the departmental prefecture, in 2005, working out of the unconverted Photosacs factory until renovations began in 2009. In this chapter I analyse the 1961 installation of Photosacs, its conversion into La Transverse, and the 2011 Ouverture festival in order to determine how a street theatre institution and a street

in Street theatre and the production of postindustrial space
Suzanne Conklin Akbari

Roland, who not only refuses the tempting offer of conversion made to him by Arabas (who mistakes Roland for Charlemagne himself), but bears witness to the Christian faith he fights for: Goddis forbode and the holy Trynytee, That ever Fraunce hethen were for mee, And lese our Crysten laye! For sothe, thou sowdane, trowe thou moste One the Fader and the Sone and the Holy Goste, Thire thre are alle in one. (406–11) As if in fulfilment of this testimony, the crucifix does not burn, but ‘laye still ay as it were colde’ (447); at last, the fire goes out, the crucifix emits

in Pulp fictions of medieval England
The lump-child and its parents in The King of Tars
Jane Gilbert

lump of flesh, without life or limb: & when πe child was ybore Wel sori wimen were πerfore, For lim no hadde it non. Bot as a rond of flesche yschore In chaumber it lay hem bifore Wiπouten blod & bon. For sorwe πe leuedi wald dye For it hadde noiπer nose no eye, Bot lay ded as πe ston. ∏e soudan com to chaumber πat tide, & wiπ his wiif he gan to chide ∏at wo was hir bigon.3 Attributing this misfortune to his wife’s insincere conversion, the Sultan takes the lump to his temple and prays to his ‘goddes’ (625) to give it human form, but to no avail. He destroys the

in Pulp fictions of medieval England
Open Access (free)
Alternative pasts, sustainable futures
David Calder

demonstrated how converted industrial sites must – for a time, at least – remain intelligible as what they once were while becoming intelligible as something else. The 2CV theatre (Chapter 1) illustrates this on the smallest of scales: the vehicle must be recognizable as both 2CV and theatre for the performance to work. This is how all sited performances function, but that function is also fundamental to a process like redevelopment. The local television news report on the conversion of Corbigny’s Photosacs factory (Chapter 2) proposed that the building was once again a

in Street theatre and the production of postindustrial space
Steve Sohmer

discovered encomium for Nashe tells us he ‘diedst a Christian faithfull penitent’? Could this be Nashe’s lament that his fellow writers (tosspots) had profited nothing by his sudden conversion – much like Paul on the Damascus road – and still had drunken heads? Likely, Nashe’s abrupt conversion suggested to Shakespeare the linking of Nashe and St Paul in Feste

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind
Open Access (free)
Lucy Munro

, and its climax focuses on the conversion of her main tormentor, Theophilus. Theophilus is brought a basket of fruit and flowers by Angelo, a mysterious boy – in reality an angel – who accompanied Dorothea in earlier scenes. As Jane Hwang Degenhardt points out, Dekker and Massinger draw closely on established, Catholic tradition in which: On her way to her own execution Dorothy’s unwavering faith is mocked by a scribe called Theophilus, who asks her to send some roses and apples from the garden of her spouse, Christ. Shortly after Dorothy’s execution, Theophilus is

in The senses in early modern England, 1558–1660
Martine Pelletier

, soon to be dubbed the ‘Celtic Tiger’ phenomenon was gathering momentum. In O’Kelly’s play, Africa is not the place where contact with the numinous and the sacred has been preserved, but a continent in the throes of violent, internecine conflicts, where barbarous acts of torture and murder are committed. Asylum! Asylum! is based on a real horrific event, reported in the 1991 Amnesty International Report. As rewritten by O’Kelly, it becomes the tale of a miraculous conversion, as well as the sad story of a failed escape from the threat of torture and death.12 Joseph

in Irish literature since 1990