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music in this region have included Anglo-American music, Italian and German light-entertainment traditions (peaking in the 1950s–70s), northern European pop–dance–rap (late 1980s–present) and music from the wider post-Ottoman space (Rasmussen 2002 ). For instance, one pan-south-east European genre with different national inflections, ‘pop-folk’, combines post-Ottoman elements of musical meaning and practice (such as vocal styles; instruments; rhythms; melody; lyrical devices), which themselves bridge ethno-linguistic boundaries and the greater symbolic boundary

in Race and the Yugoslav region

look for differences and the other is to search for common ground. Theorists of the Caribbean have for the most part made a plea for regional specificity and distinctiveness. I have in mind the early observations of Las Casas and his identification of the specificity of the region’s way of dancing, Benitez-Rojo’s observation of the Caribbean’s syncopated way of walking, Lloyd Best’s discussion of the

in Frontiers of the Caribbean

1808) and the islands of Korčula (Venetian 1420–1797) and Lastovo (Ragusan until 1808). Dubrovnik and Korčula folk traditions both include the ‘moreška’, a sword-dance where two kings fight over a symbolic princess, which ethnologists have compared to Spanish ‘moros y cristianos’ (‘Moors and Christians’) customs, Venetian mock factional battles and English morris dancing. Its contest between a Black King, who has abducted the princess and whose dancers traditionally (though rarely today) wear black faces or masks, and a White King, who in Korčula

in Race and the Yugoslav region

. Spiritual Baptists and the shifting frontier of religious acceptability [A]‌fter hymns and prayers come the part which is called Rejoicing. This consists of songs set to dance music, which cause them to shake and jump about in the most awful manner possible, in their frenzied state they make use of words which they

in Frontiers of the Caribbean

, the typical curly hair, thick lips and physical strength’; another man ‘possesses all the Negro characteristics, but his skin is somewhat lighter and he has an elongated skull’ (Lopashich 1958 : 173). Lopašić also recorded several family trees, and songs/dances with likely Arab or Bagirmi origins. His essentialised account of the ‘Negroes’ temperament was consistent with European and colonial formations of blackness: Though known for their kindheartedness, they were also much feared when in a bad

in Race and the Yugoslav region
Open Access (free)
What does race have to do with the Yugoslav region?

my old department in 2011–12, I asked Master's students ‘How would south-east European cultural studies look if it had been based on Paul Gilroy instead of Edward Said?’ Planning to mention Bangoura's interview during a paper at a conference on ‘Racialized Realities in World Politics’ in 2016, I revisited my handwritten notes from Zagreb. It might be in that daily newspaper or this magazine; I've remembered, accurately or not, it was 1993. If it was, I failed to record it. I did find – and this time had noted – an interview with a forgotten dance-music vocalist

in Race and the Yugoslav region
Open Access (free)
An epilogue

literatures of Asia, Africa, and Latin America,” construing new configurations of the mythic and the epic, space and time. 16 Finally, mid-twentieth-century cinema in the subcontinent straddled realist representations and innovative aesthetics that reached far beyond a mere “national allegory” and adroitly drew together the aural and the visual, sensibility and technique, dance and drama, the “old” and “new

in Subjects of modernity

conceptual language as lacking something essential and as therefore needing to return to something lost. Those forms of communication that Nietzsche also sees as ‘languages’, such as dance and song, which offer a more immediate access to the world of feeling, are superior to verbal language because they are ‘thoroughly instinctive, without consciousness’ (1 p. 572). Wagner, he claims, combines these ‘languages’ into a higher unity in his operas, mixing gestural and musical languages, the realm of the image and the realm of sound. There is nothing here of particular

in Aesthetics and subjectivity
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The beginning of aesthetic theory and the end of art

conceptual side alone. However much we rely on the ability of words to articulate music’s significance, this does not exhaust the ways in which a piece of music can be understood – think of the way, for example, that dance or the use of images can illuminate dimensions of music which words cannot. In existential terms, the aim of the Logic would seem to be to enable us to become reconciled with the ultimately transient nature of all determinate things, including ourselves. The reconciliation is achieved via thought’s ability to grasp the necessity of that transience if the

in Aesthetics and subjectivity