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Animal language and the return of loss in Beowulf

establishing metonymy as the dominant sign system of Beowulf , one potent example is the glorious necklace that ‘weighs like a millstone on the narrative’; arriving at a moment of triumph, it links that moment to the bitterness of past and future by participating, along with the poem's other significant rings and cups, in an endless dance of mutual reference. 47 So too does the figure of the raven bring the joy of earlier victory into tragically ironic inversion at Beowulf's death. Yet this joy is not entirely inverted, for

in Dating Beowulf
Open Access (free)
On Anglo-Saxon things

which seem to lack clear and definitive solutions.48 Even when we settle on one answer, we can never be sure that it is the answer. As a result, these riddles can never be objectified; they, too, are always partially obscured. As we say one name (shield, swan, wine, anchor, plough, moth, oyster, 17 Introduction: On Anglo-Saxon things 17 creation) a myriad of other names hover on the periphery of our vision, dance on the tip of our tongue. Riddles, like things, have the power to resist human knowledge, human mastery. The efforts of the reader to try and fail, try

in Nonhuman voices in Anglo-Saxon literature and material culture
Open Access (free)
The wall texts of a Percy family manuscript and the Poulys Daunce of St Paul’s Cathedral

probable existent, a bit of reporting on what presents itself’.28 Such a site might be the manuscript in front of a reader, a chair, a wall: whatever occurs in proximity to the body. In contrast, the imaging landing site ‘lands widely and in an un-pinpointing way, dancing attendance on the perceptual landing site, responding indirectly and diffusedly to whatever the latter leaves unprocessed’.29 The imaging site shares some characteristics with Deleuze’s notion of the out-of-field; it may be diffused, and perception might include what exists or happens around the corner

in Participatory reading in late-medieval England
Open Access (free)
Reading practices and participation in digital and medieval media

historical specificity of each period’s media. Focusing on one particular genre of digital and print media, the multi-threaded narrative, Andrew Higl explored how this genre might illuminate readers’ ludic engagement with early manuscripts of the Canterbury Tales. With a similarly tight focus, Seeta Chaganti analysed virtuality in the medieval danse macabre. Chaganti argues that dance provided a metaphor for interpretation that evokes virtual reality in response to a single poem. These and Participatory reading in late-medieval England demonstrate that perspectives offered

in Participatory reading in late-medieval England