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parties, not to mention Orsini’s wife, Flavia. In fact, after the play Orsini wrote to her, describing the evening’s entertainment as una comedia mèscolata, con musiche e balli , a comedy mixed with music and dancing. 12 Regarding the choice of entertainment, we know that Lord Chamberlain George Carey earlier had made a note to remind himself

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind

ideas fornication → body apparently stuck in Shakespeare’s mind: in 1.3 Toby urges Andrew to ‘Accost [Maria] ... front her, boord her’ (54–5); when she rebuffs him, the pair fall to talking about the quality of their bodies: hair, legs, throats, and dancing skills (92–100, 110–37). Paul protests the Corinthians’ bouts of raillery and drunkenness much

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind

ear confounds, Do I envy those jacks that nimble leap, To kiss the tender inward of thy hand, Whilst my poor lips which should that harvest reap, At the wood’s boldness by thee blushing stand! To be so tickled, they would change their state And situation with those dancing chips, O’er whom thy fingers walk with gentle

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind

simultaneously lampoons Duke Senior’s band of merry men. In 4.2 Jaques equates music with noise as he demands the Forrester’s song: ‘Sing it: ’tis no matter how it bee in tune, so it make noyse enough.’ (8–9). It comes as no surprise when in 5.4 Jaques shuns the nuptial festivities, proclaiming, ‘I am for other, then for dancing meazures’ (191). The ‘meazures’ that Marlowe favoured were

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind
Open Access (free)
Imitation of Spenserian satire

dancèd in a round” (Browne, Shepherds Pipe, 52). Before the end of the eclogue, when Browne finally identifies the author of the story as Hoccleve, not Spenser, Roget alludes one last time to Spenser by telling Willy that the author was “Scholar unto Tityrus, / Tityrus, the bravest swain / Ever livèd on the plain” (Browne, Shepherds Pipe, 53). This allusion serves as a bridge between the contemporary reader’s probable expectation that the author is Spenser and Browne’s identification of the author as Hoccleve a few lines later: whereas Hoccleve was acquainted with the

in Spenserian satire

family starred in this lively production, which had been carefully designed by Rachel Fane, her stage directions for example suggesting that the production conclude with the masquers dancing ‘ a dance of my making ’. 153 Rachel Fane also seems to have made her own games; a playing card showing the Queen of Diamonds, and inscribed ‘Rachel’, survives in the Kent Archives, Maidstone. 154 The family were

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
The ends of incompletion

spectators and the play-world, through allusions to modes of visual reshaping: Whatsoever we present we wish it may be thought the dancing of Agrippa his shadows, who in the moment they were seen were of any shape one would conceive. (Prologue at the Court, 13–15) The

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
Affiliation, allusion, allegory

figuring Alcyon as Daphne’s victim (lines 295–97, 300; military metaphors for love in sonnetry are of course commonplace: Alcyon’s metaphors in general lack freshness). Contemplating the image of Daphne’s face after death, Alcyon complains that “sad death his pourtraicture had writ” in her cheeks and “ghastly night did sit” on her eyes (lines 303, 305). Immediately after this, Alcyon spends a stanza describing her dancing among the other shepherdesses; this passage, along with the brief reference to “Daphne thou knewest” and Daphne as a paragon of womanhood (lines 183

in Spenserian satire

life changed for the ploughmen: “what a sad Christmas we all kept in the country without either carols, wassail-bowls, dancing of Sellinger’s Round in moonshine nights about maypoles, shoeing the mare, hoodman-blind, hot-cockles, or any of our old Christmas gambols; no, not so much as choosing king and queen on Twelfth Night” (lines 638–42). Again, we here see nostalgia for an earlier era, when landlords understood that their social position conferred upon them the obligation of hospitality, especially at Christmas-time, toward social inferiors (Heal, Hospitality

in Spenserian satire